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Aircraft Transparency Systems

Staff Sgt. Cody Brown, 138th Maintenance Squadron, polishes the canopy of an F-16 fighter jet as part of the post-flight procedures on July 13, 2016 at the 138th Fighter Wing.Engineering safety into flight

UDRI’s Structures researchers have been involved in the design, analysis, testing, and/or transition of aircraft transparency systems that have flown on over 20 DoD aircraft. Our independent, unbiased perspective has facilitated a long-standing relationship with AFRL to assess current generation transparent materials and coatings, and to evaluate emerging manufacturing methods and materials.

We understand diverse aircraft transparency system integration requirements, including those for optics, durability, performance, ejection, man/machine interface, etc. UDRI engineers also have experience writing aircraft transparency performance specifications, as well as qualification testing requirements.

We have extensive research facilities tailored to address specific transparency-related problems, including structural analysis software for bird impact-resistant design, durability test equipment for evaluating environmental effects on transparent materials and coatings, high strain rate test facilities for generating transparency material properties for design, optical test equipment, and facilities for bird impact testing.

Our customers include both commercial and military organizations, and we have worked with all major U.S. transparency manufacturers and airframers. Contact us today about solving your technical challenges in aircraft transparencies.

Contact Us: 937-229-2113  |  E-Mail  |  Form

Top: Staff Sgt. Cody Brown, 138th Maintenance Squadron, polishes the canopy of an F-16 fighter jet as part of the post-flight procedures on July 13, 2016 at the 138th Fighter Wing. The wraparound canopy provides ideal light in-flight and can withstand the impact of a 4 pound bird at 550 knots. Air National Guard photo/Master Sgt. Roberta A. Thompson

CONTACT

University of Dayton Research Institute


300 College Park
Dayton, Ohio 45469 - 7759
937-229-2113
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