Skip to main content

COVID-19 Health Resources

The University is committed to protecting the health and safety of our campus community. The steps we are taking follow the guidance of public health officials and are what we believe to be in the best interest of UD and the surrounding community.

The information on this page includes answers to frequently asked questions, links to health resources and UD's case dashboard, and where you can report if you have COVID-19, are a close contact of someone with COVID-19 or if you've received your vaccine.

For answers to questions not found here, please fill out our online information form for the quickest response. On-campus faculty, staff and students click here. Parents and others not on campus, click here.

Where can I?

Find COVID-19 vaccinations at several off-campus locations here.

When you do receive your COVID-19 vaccination, be sure to report it here immediately. 

No registration needed or insurance documentation is needed for a flu vaccine; but bring your UD ID. 

There is no out-of-pocket cost for the COVID-19 vaccination, but it may be submitted to your insurance to cover administration fees. Bring your insurance card, UD ID and driver's license or passport for the COVID-19 vaccination; Premier Health will assist those on-site who do not have health insurance. 

Premier Health After Hours Urgent Care: 5-9 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Located in Marianist Hall, across from the Student Health Center and above the bookstore. Make an appointment via the link.

In Ohio, you can schedule an appointment through the state's streamlined vaccine tool, or book directly with a local provider, such as Public Health - Dayton & Montgomery County or Premier Health. New appointments are posted regularly.

For other areas of the country, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a vaccine finder along with other information on COVID-19 vaccines.

In addition to on-campus opportunities for flu vaccines, employees and students can get a flu vaccine from their primary care physician or many local pharmacies.


Students can get tested 8:30 to 4:30 p.m. weekdays at the Student Health Center, by appointment only, and 5-9 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Premier Health After Hours Urgent Care located in Marianist Hall, across from the Student Health Center and above the bookstore. Premier Health After Hours Urgent Care will accept students and employees for walk-in tests 8:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. weekdays. Tests also may be available through your healthcare provider or Ohio's testing center website. The type of COVID-19 tests offered may differ by location. 

In Ohio: Visit Ohio's testing center website. 

Outside Ohio: Visit your state health department’s website for testing location.  

The type of COVID-19 tests offered may differ by location.


Click here to disclose if you have COVID-19 or have been determined to be a close contact of someone with COVID-19.


Upload your official COVID-19 vaccination card, which includes your full name, date of birth and vaccine details on the confidential "Report Your Vaccine" portal.

Upload record of your booster, along with the same information, here.

You also can email your vaccine card to covidhealthreporting@udayton.edu or email that address to request a Zoom meeting to show your card.

Reporting your vaccination record, including your booster, is not required, but highly recommended so we can track the level of immunity in the UD community.  

The confidential process used for collecting and storing COVID-19 vaccination information is similar to the process all first-year students follow to submit their other vaccination information. Your vaccination information will be treated confidentially; it is not tied to employment or academic records.

Once you upload your vaccination record, you should receive a confirmation email from notify@teamdynamixapp.com with the subject line "[Confidential] Report of COVID-19 Vaccination Received."

If a UD employee requests that Human Resources replenish their sick time (up to 24 hours for side effects from COVID-19 vaccinations), then they must report their full COVID-19 vaccination and upload their record.


Student Health Center spring semester hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. 

Premier Health After Hours Urgent Care: 5-9 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Located in Marianist Hall, across from the Student Health Center and above the bookstore.

Employees should consult with their primary care provider.

  • During regular hours, students can call the Student Health Center at 937-229-3131 to schedule an appointment with one of the University's board-certified primary care physicians or registered nurses, or after hours, contact Premier Health After Hours Urgent Care.
  • In addition to checkups and urgent care, rapid COVID-19 testing for students also will be available at the Student Health Center and the Premier Health After Hours Urgent Care. Please alert the Health Center if you are having coronavirus symptoms when you schedule your appointment. Additionally, the Student Health Center provides a broad spectrum of comprehensive services.
  • Students who test positive or are a close contact of someone who has tested positive must fill out the online disclosure form and make arrangements for isolation or quarantine if possible. You do not need to wait for the contact tracer to contact you.
  • The Counseling Center will be offering a hybrid model of online (telebehavioral health) and in-person counseling services. Call 937-229-3141 to make an appointment. Initial meetings will be conducted in person at Gosiger Hall, and students may discuss their preferences for online or in-person sessions at that time. Students residing more than 25 miles from campus may request an initial online appointment. Only students physically present in the state of Ohio will be eligible for telebehavioral health services. Per state law, counseling center therapists cannot provide clinical services outside of the state of Ohio. If you are in crisis, call the Counseling Center at 937-229-3141 during business hours, Public Safety at 937-229-2121, or the National Suicide Hotline 800-273-8255, or text “Help” to 741741.

General information about healthcare resources

Student Health Center fall semester hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. 

Premier Health After Hours Urgent Care: 5-9 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Located in Marianist Hall, across from the Student Health Center and above the bookstore.

Employees should consult with their primary care provider.

COVID-19 in young adults is often mild or asymptomatic, but people of all ages may experience mild to serious lingering effects, even after minor infections, which include cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, exercise intolerance or brain fog. 

If you are experiencing these long-term effects, here are steps you can take:

  • Students who have prolonged symptoms are encouraged to make an appointment with a physician at the University Student Health Center. For sudden worsening of prolonged symptoms, or medical emergencies, call Public Safety at 937-229-2121. Students are encouraged to program this emergency number into their phones.
  • The Counseling Center will be offering a hybrid model of online (telebehavioral health) and in-person counseling services. Call 937-229-3141 to make an appointment. Initial meetings will be conducted in person at Gosiger Hall, and students may discuss their preferences for online or in-person sessions at that time. Students residing more than 25 miles from campus may request an initial online appointment. Only students physically present in the state of Ohio will be eligible for telebehavioral health services. Per state law, counseling center therapists cannot provide clinical services outside of the state of Ohio. If you are in crisis, call the Counseling Center at 937-229-3141 during business hours, Public Safety at 937-229-2121, or the National Suicide Hotline 800-273-8255, or text “Help” to 741741.
  • Additionally, students dealing with long-term effects of COVID-19 may seek academic accommodations through their adviser or dean's offices or mental health support through the University's Counseling Center. 

College of Arts and Sciences dean's office - casdean@udayton.edu

School of Business Administration dean's office - sbadean@udayton.edu

School of Education and Health Sciences - sehs_assistant_dean@udayton.edu

School of Engineering - Michelle Strunks

School of Law - Lee Ann Ross


Student Health Center spring semester hours: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. 

Premier Health After Hours Urgent Care: 5-9 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Located in Marianist Hall, across from the Student Health Center and above the bookstore.

Testing

  • Students can get tested 8:30 to 4:30 p.m. weekdays at the Student Health Center, by appointment only, and 5-9 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Premier Health After Hours Urgent Care located in Marianist Hall, across from the Student Health Center and above the bookstore. Premier Health After Hours Urgent Care will accept students and employees for walk-in tests 8:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. weekdays. Tests also may be available through your healthcare provider or Ohio's testing center website. The type of COVID-19 tests offered may differ by location. 
  • Individuals may be subject to surveillance and targeted testing the University, in consultation with its medical panel, determines is appropriate based on the nature of the pandemic on campus, including suspected clusters in specific areas or populations.
  • Students are required to report COVID-19-related health conditions at the COVID-19 Health Reporting webpage. Employees should report their COVID-19-related health conditions at the same link. Use the forms to self-disclose positive COVID-19 test results, report a close contact exposure to UD if they have been contacted by public health officials, or provide a "final day" symptoms update on the last day of quarantine/isolation. 
  • The University will attempt to protect the privacy of individuals who have a positive COVID-19 test result, especially within the UD community. However, the University will coordinate with public health officials so that appropriate measures, such as contact tracing, can be taken to slow the spread of infection. Certain campus and public health officials will need to know the identity of anyone who tests positive. 

Isolation Procedures for Confirmed Positive Cases

The University will follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shortened isolation period for the general population of five days.

  • Students living within 200 miles of campus are expected to isolate at their permanent residence. Otherwise, students should isolate in-place. There are a limited number of isolation spaces available for special circumstances; having students isolate off-campus or in-place on campus will help keep these spaces open. Employees should isolate at home.
  • Students should stop going to class and employees should not go to work in-person. Employees should work remotely if able. 
  • Wear KN95 or Fluidshield Level 3 medical masks for 10 days when around others, which the University will provide to you.
  • Do not go out for food; have others pick up/make food for you or order delivery to leave outside your door.
  • Instructors will be notified of a student's absence from class for a COVID-19 life event.

Quarantine Procedures for Close Contacts

If you are unvaccinated

  • You are permitted to go to class; however, it is very important to wear a KN95 or Fluidshield Level 3 medical mask, which the University will provide to you. This approach aligns with the state of Ohio's guidance. Nearly two years of this pandemic have demonstrated clearly that in-person learning is crucial to student well-being and academic success at the University of Dayton, and remote learning, especially at the start of the semester, can create significant, long-term academic and life challenges for many students. It's important to remain in the classroom, but please take the necessary precautions to keep yourself and your classmates safe.
  • Outside of the classroom, quarantine in place for five days; wear a KN95 or Fluidshield Level 3 medical mask for 10 days, which the University will provide to you; and do not attend social gatherings.You can get grab-and-go food from the dining halls or have others pick up/make food for you or order delivery to leave outside your door. 
  • Employees should work remotely if able. Anyone who cannot work remotely may return to work if asymptomatic AND if they have a negative test result within 48 hours of learning known exposure. However, it is very important to wear a KN95 or Fluidshield Level 3 medical mask, which the University will provide to you.
  • If asymptomatic, test within 48 hours of learning known exposure.
  • If symptoms develop, test immediately and stop attending class.
  • If you do not test within 48 hours and do not submit daily symptom checks, then students may not be able to attend classes. Instructors will be notified of a student's absence from class for a COVID-19 life event. 
  • See "Testing" section above for where to obtain tests. 

Any student in quarantine or isolation must coordinate with their supervisor or class instructor regarding time away from work or the classroom. Remote learning is no longer an automatic option for students.

If vaccinated…

  • Wear a mask around others for 10 days. The University's preferred face covering is a KN95 or Fluidshield Level 3 medical mask.
  • Test on day 5 from when the exposure occurred, if possible.
  • If you develop symptoms, get a test and stay home.

Contact Tracing

Close contact means:

  • You were within six feet of someone indoors who has COVID-19 for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more during a 24-hour period and NOT wearing a mask — starting from two days before illness onset (or, for asymptomatic patients, two days prior to specimen collection) until the time the patient is isolated.
  • You are a housemate or roommate of someone testing positive with COVID-19.
  • You provided care at home to someone who is sick with COVID-19.
  • You had direct physical contact with the person (touched, hugged, or kissed them).
  • You shared eating or drinking utensils.
  • They sneezed, coughed, or somehow got respiratory droplets on you.
  • More information is available from the CDC.

How will UD identify close contacts?

  • The contact tracing process will begin when the Student Health Center is notified of a confirmed COVID-19 case either by public health, a laboratory test or a student or employee's self-disclosure. The University’s team of trained contact tracers will interview those diagnosed with COVID-19 to identify their close contacts on campus. The tracers will then call those close contacts to give them details on the quarantine process, self-care, etc. Housing will contact students regarding a move to their quarantine location. Roommates or housemates of someone who has identified as testing positive would be considered a close contact and should follow the quarantine procedures.

Why is the health department calling me when I've already talked to a contact tracer at UD?

  • Students may also receive legally required calls from Public Health Dayton-Montgomery County or the health department for your permanent residence. Students are required to speak with these tracers as well.

What if I'm a close contact of a close contact?

  • According to the CDC, close contact (for purposes of quarantine requirements, etc.) is any individual who was within six feet of an infected person for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more during a 24-hour period starting from two days before illness onset (or, for asymptomatic patients, two days prior to positive specimen collection) until the time the patient is isolated. 

Additional information

  • Fully vaccinated means two weeks have elapsed after the second dose of a two-dose series, such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or two weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.
  • Students quarantining off campus can be tested by their primary care physician or an urgent care in their areas.
  • Employees can be tested by their primary care physician or an urgent care in their area.
  • In all cases, if you have questions, please consult your case manager, primary care physician, or the Student Health Center at 937-229-3131.
  • In all cases, if you have questions, please consult your primary care physician regarding symptoms or email covidhealthreporting@udayton.edu for isolation/quarantine concerns. Serious symptoms require an immediate call to your doctor or 911. 

What if I come in contact with someone tested for or diagnosed with COVID-19, or I live or work where there is COVID-19?

If you are a resident of or work in a community where there is an ongoing spread of COVID-19, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance calls for you to monitor your health and call your healthcare provider right away if you develop symptoms of COVID-19

If you have been identified by the public health department as a close contact of someone with COVID-19 or you are being tested for the virus, please contact your healthcare provider, work remotely and self-quarantine until a healthcare professional determines you do not have or are free of the virus. See CDC explanation of "close contact" here.

Anyone testing positive for COVID-19 or notified by public health officials they are a close contact of someone with COVID-19 must fill out this disclosure form. 

The University is asking everyone who can work from home to do so during isolation/quarantine.

Please note the seasonal flu and other respiratory viruses are expected to be prevalent in the area during the fall and winter, but can occur year-round. While it is prudent to take symptoms seriously, do not assume you have or someone else has COVID-19 because they are unwell. 

I'm not feeling well. Who decides if I need to be tested? 
I am an employee who was sent home due to fever. What should I do?

Please call your healthcare provider who will decide whether you need to be tested. If you don't have a primary care provider, you can reach out to a telehealth service, such as LiveHealthOnline, which is available to those with health insurance through the university.

Please note the seasonal flu and other respiratory viruses are expected to be prevalent in the area during the fall and winter, but can occur year-round. While it is prudent to take symptoms seriously, do not assume you have or someone else has COVID-19 because they are unwell. 

What if employees start exhibiting symptoms while on campus?

If a faculty or staff member begins exhibiting symptoms while they are on campus, they should leave campus immediately and consult their primary care provider. 

Faculty and staff should report COVID-19-related health conditions at the University's COVID-19 Health Reporting webpage. Use the forms to self-disclose positive COVID-19 test results, report a close contact exposure if they have been contacted by public health officials, or provide a "final day" symptoms update on the last day of quarantine/isolation. 

What happens if I test positive for COVID-19?

If you are positive for COVID-19, you should abide by CDC guidelines, including self-isolation. Call your healthcare provider or a telehealth provider to discuss self-care recommendations. You may be contacted to identify your close contacts so they can take precautions, including self-quarantine. If you need to go into a facility such as an urgent care center or an emergency room, call before you go and let the facility or 911 know that you are positive for COVID-19 and follow their instructions to prevent spread of the virus to healthcare providers, patients and others.

How long should I isolate myself?

How long someone is actively infectious can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made on a case-by-case basis in consultation with doctors, infection prevention and control experts, and public health officials.

Current CDC guidance for when it is OK to release someone from isolation includes a number of factors for doctors and public health experts to take into consideration. Someone who has been released from isolation is not considered to pose a risk of infection to others.

If I have been identified by the public health department as a close contact of someone with COVID-19, are there steps I should take to help avoid getting sick?

In addition to following health department guidance about self-quarantine, here are additional recommended precautions from the CDC for household members, intimate partners and caregivers in a non-healthcare setting of a patient with symptomatic laboratory-confirmed COVID-19, or a patient under investigation. See CDC explanation of "close contact" here.

I'm a supervisor. What if someone reports to me they have COVID-19?

If you receive a report, confirmed or unconfirmed, that a member of your team has been exposed to or has contracted coronavirus, please call the UD Student Health Center at 937-229-3131 for guidance. Please remember not to share the person's health information with colleagues. This is a violation of their privacy, and this information may be protected by HIPAA and other laws. 

Anyone testing positive for COVID-19 or notified by public health officials they are a close contact of someone with COVID-19 must fill out this disclosure form. 

What if I find out an employee or someone in their home was exposed somewhere outside the home to COVID-19? 

"Close contact" is described by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as being within 6 feet of a person for more than 15 minutes during a 24-hour period. Furthermore, a contact of a contact is not a contact. The employee or you would not become a contact unless the person in your home showed symptoms of COVID-19. A good rule of thumb is, if you or the person in your home who works where there is COVID-19 are not contacted by a public health official for contact tracing, you should be safe.

Anyone testing positive for COVID-19 or notified by public health officials they are a close contact of someone with COVID-19 must fill out this disclosure form. 

I'm a supervisor. What should I do if I suspect someone has COVID-19?

Supervisors (with the support and involvement of HR as needed) should ask employees who are exhibiting symptoms to go home and contact their healthcare provider for further evaluation, including when it is safe to return to work. We ask staff to cooperate with supervisors for the well-being of all.

Anyone testing positive for COVID-19 or notified by public health officials they are a close contact of someone with COVID-19 must fill out this disclosure form. 

==============================

If you are feeling anxious or worried about COVID-19, students can call the Counseling Center at 937-229-3141 and employees may contact Lifeworks Employee Assistance Program.

The Counseling Center will be offering a hybrid model of online (telebehavioral health) and in-person counseling services during the fall 2021 semester. Call 937-229-3141 to make an appointment. Initial meetings will be conducted in person at Gosiger Hall, and students may discuss their preferences for online or in-person sessions at that time. Students residing more than 25 miles from campus may request an initial online appointment. Only students physically present in the state of Ohio will be eligible for telebehavioral health services. Per state law, counseling center therapists cannot provide clinical services outside of the state of Ohio. If you are in crisis, call the Counseling Center at 937-229-3141 during business hours, Public Safety at 937-229-2121, or the National Suicide Hotline 800-273-8255, or text “Help” to 741741.


Facilities management has prepared campus facilities for full occupancy. Air filters in HVAC systems are changed on a regular basis under the preventative maintenance program. Building water systems have been flushed and tested as appropriate to eliminate stagnant water. Alpha and Omega, UD’s custodial contractor, has continued its additional cleaning and disinfecting protocol, including daily cleaning of surface areas in common areas, restrooms, elevators, stairwells and other high touch points. Facilities management will provide more information as the fall term approaches.


Vaccine FAQs

All vaccines have proven to be close to 100% effective in preventing severe illness and death attributable to COVID-19. In phase 3 clinical trials, the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was 95% effective against contracting symptomatic COVID-19. The Moderna vaccine was 94% effective against contracting symptomatic COVID-19. The Johnson & Johnson Janssen vaccine was 85% effective against contracting symptomatic COVID-19.

Learn More about How COVID-19 Vaccines Work (CDC)


Information about the characteristics of most currently identified variants in the U.S. is rapidly emerging. Scientists are working to learn more about how easily they spread, whether they could cause more severe illness and whether currently authorized vaccines will protect people against them.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, current information suggests COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States offer protection against most variants. 

However, some variants might cause illness in some people after they are fully vaccinated. Read more about breakthrough cases from the CDC here.

These variants seem to spread more easily and quickly than other variants, which may lead to more cases of COVID-19. An increase in the number of cases will put more strain on healthcare resources, lead to more hospitalizations, and potentially more deaths.

Anyone not vaccinated against COVID-19 is at significant risk of infection from COVID-19 or its variants. Unvaccinated individuals are also at a particular risk of experiencing severe infection from COVID-19.  

Everyone is strongly encouraged to be fully vaccinated to protect themselves, their loved ones, and vulnerable others from current variants and to prevent future variants.

In addition to vaccinations, physical distancing, face coverings and hand hygiene are among the strategies to consider to limit the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 and protect public health.

Read about COVID-19 Vaccine Effectiveness Research here

CDC vaccination data tracker


In speaking about the Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines, Pope Francis said: "I believe that ethically everyone must take the vaccine. It is not an option; it is an ethical action, because you are playing with your health, you are playing with your life, but you are also playing with the lives of others." The Vatican's doctrinal office also has said it is morally acceptable for Catholics to take the vaccines.

Additional guidance comes from the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, which has stated that receiving the COVID-19 vaccine "ought to be understood as an act of charity toward the other members of our community. In this way, being vaccinated safely against COVID-19 should be considered an act of love of our neighbor and part of our moral responsibility for the common good."

Additionally, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops provide additional guidance regarding the Johnson & Johnson vaccine here: U.S. Bishop Chairmen for Doctrine and for Pro-Life Address the Use of the Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 Vaccine.

Catholic Cares, a coalition of U.S. Catholic organizations, encourages the public to get vaccinated, provides information about the teachings of Pope Francis and U.S. Catholic Bishops on accepting the vaccine.


None of the emergency use authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines or COVID-19 vaccines in development in the United States contains the live virus that causes COVID-19, so a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

However, some vaccinations may result in short-term symptoms. These symptoms are a result of the vaccine teaching the immune system how to recognize and fight the virus, and are a sign the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19.

It also is possible to be exposed and develop COVID-19 illness shortly after vaccination and before your body develops protective antibodies.

Learn More About How COVID-19 Vaccines Work (CDC)


You may have mild side effects, including soreness or redness at the injection site. Other common short-term side effects are fever, chills, headache, tiredness and muscle or joint pain. These side effects are normal as your body creates an immune response to protect you from COVID-19, and may increase with the second dose.

Individuals who were infected with COVID-19 may experience some of these symptoms after the first vaccine dose.

It is recommended to drink plenty of water and eat something before your vaccination.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, serious side effects that could cause a long-term health problem are extremely unlikely following any vaccination, including COVID-19 vaccination. Vaccine monitoring has historically shown that side effects generally happen within six weeks of receiving a vaccine dose. For this reason, the FDA required each of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines to be studied for at least two months (eight weeks) after the final dose. Almost 200 million people have received COVID-19 vaccines, with serious issues connected to the vaccines rarely detected.

CDC continues to closely monitor the safety of COVID-19 vaccines. If scientists find a connection between a safety issue and a vaccine, FDA and the vaccine manufacturer will work toward an appropriate solution to address the specific safety concern (for example, a problem with a specific lot, a manufacturing issue, or the vaccine itself).

You can read more about COVID-19 vaccine side effects from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention here.

View a Video About What to Expect (CDC)


According to an Ohio Department of Health update July 2, 2021, the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) continues to recommend COVID-19 vaccination for individuals 12 years of age and older, given the risk of COVID-19 illness and related, possibly severe complications such as long-term health problems, hospitalization and death. 

The American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Medical Association, the American College of Physicians, the American Heart Association, American Nurses Association and several other organizations have joined the CDC in issuing a joint statement on COVID-19 vaccination and myocarditis/pericarditis.

“The facts are clear: this is an extremely rare side effect, and only an exceedingly small number of people will experience it after vaccination. Importantly, for the young people who do, most cases are mild, and individuals recover often on their own or with minimal treatment. In addition, we know that myocarditis and pericarditis are much more common if you get COVID-19, and the risks to the heart from COVID-19 infection can be more severe,” according to the statement.

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has updated COVID-19 Vaccine Emergency Use Authorization fact sheets for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines for patients and providers to include the risks of myocarditis and pericarditis following vaccination. In addition, the CDC updated for providers its clinical considerations regarding myocarditis and pericarditis. These updates follow a review of information and a discussion by the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices last week. The FDA and CDC will continue to monitor reports, collect more information, and follow up to assess longer-term outcomes over several months.

Since April 2021, there have been more than 1,000 reports of cases of myocarditis and pericarditis after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination (i.e., Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna) in the United States. However, not all cases have been verified. The CDC is evaluating 484 total reported cases, 323 of which meet the CDC working case definition for myocarditis or pericarditis. All of these cases were among vaccine recipients younger than 30. The CDC notes these reports are rare given the millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses administered.

Read more information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention here.


It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build protection against the virus that causes COVID-19 after vaccination. So it is possible someone could be infected with COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and still get sick with the virus before they are fully immune.


None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection. Neither can any of the COVID-19 vaccines currently in clinical trials in the United States.

If your body develops an immune response to vaccination, which is the goal, you may test positive on some antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate you had a previous infection and that you may have some level of protection against the virus. Experts are currently looking at how COVID-19 vaccination may affect antibody testing results.


Yes, because of the severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and because reinfection with COVID-19 is possible. Experts are unsure of the strength or length of the natural immunity of someone who had COVID-19.  They have said the duration of immunity after having COVID-19 is variable and could go away as early as three months. Vaccination boosts and extends that protection, including to new variants identified as of June 2021.

You can read more from the Centers for Disease Control here.

Based on guidance available in summer 2021, UD is not currently requiring individuals who are vaccinated to go through surveillance testing or quarantine as a close contact if symptom-free. However, because of the uncertainty about the variants, the duration of immunity from having COVID, and the evolving nature of the pandemic, anyone not vaccinated  ⏤ even if they have had COVID-19 ⏤ may be subject to surveillance and targeted testing, including suspected clusters in specific locations or populations. If pandemic conditions change, surveillance and targeted testing requirements may also change and extend to more individuals.


COVID-19 mRNA vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way.

Learn More About How COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines Work (CDC)


According to the CDC, based on current knowledge, experts believe COVID-19 vaccines are unlikely to pose a risk to a person trying to become pregnant in the short or long term. Furthermore, the CDC adds there is no evidence antibodies formed from COVID-19 vaccination cause any problems with pregnancy, including the development of the placenta. In addition, there is no evidence suggesting fertility problems are a side effect of ANY vaccine. People who are trying to become pregnant now or who plan to try in the future may receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Pregnant women have a higher risk of complications from being infected with COVID-19, so they are advised to discuss vaccination with their obstetrician.

The CDC also states mRNA vaccines are not thought to be a risk to the breastfeeding infant. People who are breastfeeding may choose to be vaccinated.

If you are planning to get a screening mammogram soon, you may wish to schedule that with the timing of the second dose of your vaccine in mind. Some experts recommend waiting until six weeks after the second vaccine dose. Consider consulting with your physician for more insight.

Additional information can be found at the bottom of the CDC's "Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines" page and the CDC's "Vaccination Considerations for People who are Pregnant or Breastfeeding," plus by consulting with your primary care physician or specialist.


The COVID-19 vaccines available in the United States do not contain eggs, preservatives or latex. For a full list of ingredients, please see each vaccine's fact sheet for recipients and caregivers: 


Yes. Approximately 42% of participants in Pfizer BioNTech's worldwide clinical trials, 37% of the Moderna study population, and 26% of the participants in Johnson & Johnson's study were from minority communities, which is similar to the diversity of the U.S. at large.

In addition, clinical studies included participants age 65 and older (21% of Pfizer-BioNTech participants; 23% of Moderna participants) or 60 and older (34% of Johnson & Johnson participants); and those with high-risk chronic diseases, such as diabetes, severe obesity and cardiac disease (46% of Pfizer-BioNTech participants; 42% of Moderna participants; 41% of Johnson & Johnson participants).


Everyone, whether vaccinated or not, is required to wear face coverings in most shared indoor spaces on campus.

  • The University's preferred face covering is a KN95 or Fluidshield Level 3 medical mask. Go to Porches for info on how to get them.
  • Face coverings are required indoors, including in academic, classroom, studio, lab and related spaces. They also are required in Kennedy Union (including all activities in The Hangar), The Hub at the Arcade, the Chapel of the Immaculate Conception, all dining facilities (except when actively eating or drinking), RecPlex public areas (except when actively engaged in exercising), and UD transportation (shuttles, etc). 
  • You do not need a face covering if you are alone in a non-shared workspace, such as a private office or cubicle with sides extending above your head on at least three sides.
  • Face coverings/masks are required in all residential common areas such as lobbies, main desk areas, offices, first floor common area hallways, elevators, stairways, laundry rooms and mail rooms. Face coverings are strongly recommended in student residential shared living areas.
  • Face coverings are highly recommended at UD Arena.
  • You can read the University's updated guidance on face coverings here.

If you travel, you should still take steps to protect yourself and others. You likely still will be required to wear a mask on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States, and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations.

You should still watch out for symptoms of COVID-19, especially if you've been around someone who is sick. If you have symptoms of COVID-19, you should get tested and stay home and away from others.

People who have a condition or are taking medications that weaken the immune system should talk to their healthcare provider to discuss their activities. They may need to keep taking all precautions to prevent COVID-19.


  • Unvaccinated individuals and all who test positive will still be required to quarantine and/or isolate based on the University’s protocols in consultation with its medical advisory panel, e.g., following any travel, if identified as a close contact, if presumed positive, etc. 
  • Anyone in quarantine or isolation must coordinate with their supervisor or class instructor regarding time away from work or the classroom. Remote learning is no longer an automatic option for students.
  • Individuals may be subject to surveillance and targeted testing the University, in consultation with its medical panel, determines is appropriate based on the nature of the pandemic on campus, including suspected clusters in specific areas or populations.

UD-Specific Vaccine FAQs

You can schedule an appointment through Ohio's streamlined vaccine tool, or book directly with a local provider. Many of these clinics are close to campus, and transportation is available via the RTA or The Flyer. New appointments are posted regularly.


Employees should use sick time to get the vaccine, as well as for time taken because of an adverse reaction to the vaccine. Similar to reporting for a COVID-19 illness, report your sick time as you normally would and then contact Beth Schwartz, director of UD's benefits and wellness program, to replenish your charged sick time.

UD employees should use this form to report they've received their full COVID-19 vaccination and upload their full vaccination record; this form needs to be completed to replenish your sick time (up to 24 hours for side effects from COVID-19 vaccinations).


Upload your official COVID-19 vaccination card, which includes your full name, date of birth and vaccine details on the confidential "Report Your Vaccine" portal.

Upload record of your booster, along with the same information, here.

You also can email your vaccine card to covidhealthreporting@udayton.edu or email that address to request a Zoom meeting to show your card.

Reporting your vaccination record, including your booster, is not required, but highly recommended so we can track the level of immunity in the UD community.  

The confidential process used for collecting and storing COVID-19 vaccination information is similar to the process all first-year students follow to submit their other vaccination information. Your vaccination information will be treated confidentially; it is not tied to employment or academic records.

Once you upload your vaccination record, you should receive a confirmation email from notify@teamdynamixapp.com with the subject line "[Confidential] Report of COVID-19 Vaccination Received."

If you didn't receive the vaccine card or lost it, your first step is to contact your vaccination provider. If you can't contact your provider, you can contact your state health department’s immunization information system (IIS). All vaccination providers must report COVID-19 vaccinations to their IIS. State health departments will either email or mail a copy of your vaccination card, although it may take one to two weeks.

If a UD employee requests that Human Resources replenish their sick time (up to 24 hours for side effects from COVID-19 vaccinations), then they must report their full COVID-19 vaccination and upload their record.


If you didn't receive the vaccine card or lost it, your first step is to contact your vaccination provider. If you can't contact your provider, you can contact your state health department’s immunization information system (IIS). All vaccination providers must report COVID-19 vaccinations to their IIS. State health departments will either email or mail a copy of your vaccination card, although it may take one to two weeks.


Individuals may be subject to testing the University, in consultation with its medical panel, determines is appropriate based on the nature of the pandemic on campus, including suspected clusters in specific areas or populations. It is possible -- depending on the pandemic -- that such testing would include vaccinated individuals.


Will the University require student-employees, faculty and staff to have the COVID-19 vaccine?

Jan. 14, 2022: The U.S. Supreme Court struck down the federal OSHA rule for large employers regarding employee vaccinations and the requirement that unvaccinated workers (even if exempted) be tested weekly for COVID-19.

As such, the University lifted its requirements, announced to campus on Jan. 11, that employees be vaccinated or, if unvaccinated with an exemption, undergo weekly testing starting Feb. 9. 

The University strongly encourages all workers and students to be vaccinated, including the booster shot, to protect their own health and the common good. You can find COVID-19 vaccinations at several off-campus locations here

Will any University employees be required to be vaccinated?

Yes, there may be specific locations (such as at an off-campus research location) or circumstances (e.g., where other regulations apply, particularly vulnerable populations exist, etc.) where vaccinations might be required. Employees in such areas will be notified if they face a vaccine requirement.