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Marian Library Collection Development and Management Policy

Contents

Revised Jan. 18, 2018

The Marian Library was founded by the Marianists of the University of Dayton in 1943 to make the Blessed Virgin Mary better known, loved, and served. Its presence on campus is a significant expression of the University’s Catholic and Marianist identity. The Marian Library’s unique collections are developed and maintained to preserve and provide access to materials that foster Marian scholarship and sound Marian devotion.

The Marian Library is recognized nationally and internationally as a center for scholarship on the Blessed Virgin Mary. It serves the research needs of faculty and students of the International Marian Research Institute, the broader University of Dayton community, and visitors throughout the world. It also documents diverse expressions of popular devotion to Mary and provides public outreach through its exhibits, tours, and reference services.

As a part of the University Libraries system of the University of Dayton, the Marian Library cooperates with the Roesch Library and the U.S. Catholic Special Collection in order to share resources and reduce duplication.


The nature and extent of the Library’s holdings made possible the establishment in 1975 of the International Marian Research Institute (IMRI). The collections and services of the Marian Library support IMRI’s coursework and research activities.

The Marian Library also serves the research needs of the faculty and students engaged in diverse fields of study throughout the University of Dayton community, and its materials support the ongoing formation and research needs of members of the Marianist religious family.

The Marian Library welcomes visitors from around the world, and its collections and art exhibits support a range of interests from casual inquiry to doctoral-level research. The Marian Library extends its audience beyond its physical borders through ongoing digitization efforts and informational Web sites.


Materials on the Virgin Mary come from almost all religious cultures and periods; therefore, the Marian Library places no linguistic chronological, or geographic limitations on its collection of Marian books and periodicals. Since European theologians have developed many of the theological issues related to Marian studies, e.g., ecclesiology and Christology, the General Theological and Reference collection includes many books in German, French, Italian, and Spanish. Other collections may have linguistic, chronological, or geographic limitations, but the Marian Library seeks to improve its collection of materials in underrepresented languages.

A. Marian Books

1. The current collection

The heart of the Marian Library is its comprehensive collection of Marian books. It contains books directly related to Mary, including but not limited to the following topics:

  • Marian doctrines
  • Theological and spiritual writings, sermons, and meditations on Mary
  • Marian prayers and devotions
  • Marian apparitions and shrines
  • Mary in literature
  • Lives of Mary
  • Artistic representations of Mary
  • Historical surveys of Marian theology

It also contains books on persons (such as visionary saints), religious orders (including but not limited to the Marianists), and other movements strongly associated with the figure of the Blessed Virgin Mary. It aspires to be exhaustive and complete.

2. Criteria for inclusion and ongoing collection interests

Any books directly related to Marian topics such as those listed above should be  acquired for inclusion in the Marian Books collection. Juvenile books, art books and rare books on Marian topics are treated separately and described in separate sections below.

B. General Theological Books

1. The current collection

This component of the collection contains theological books that are not directly Marian but can contribute to a deeper understanding of Mary. This reflects the trend following the Second Vatican Council to integrate Mariology into a broader theological framework. The books in this collection also support the IMRI program’s general theology courses on Christology, soteriology, ecclesiology, spirituality, and others. Among the highlights of this collection are the numerous theological works in Latin, French, German, Italian, and Spanish.

The collection includes:
  • Books on Catholic systematic theology, doctrine, spirituality, and liturgy
  • Books on scriptural interpretation
  • Books on the history of the Church
  • Collections of the writings of the Church Fathers
  • Selected writings of medieval, post-Reformation, and modern theologians and saints
  • Non-theological books that can provide historical, cultural, literary, philosophical, psychological, or sociological perspectives for understanding the person of Mary

2. Criteria for inclusion and ongoing collection interests

Over the years, numerous books have entered the collection that seem unfitting, such as books on mathematical theory. One reason is that in its early penurious years, the Marian Library was considered a depository for the books of deceased Marianists and  of others closely associated with the library. Furthermore, at times, a creative hermeneutic has been applied to justify the inclusion of tangential books. Therefore, it is necessary to be more specific about the types of books that should be contained in the General Theological Books collection and to make deselection an ongoing process.

Appropriate types of books to purchase or accept for this collection include those in the following subject areas, keeping in mind that many of these support the curriculum and research areas of specific IMRI courses:

  • Scripture (focusing on those biblical books that have traditionally been given a Marian interpretation, as well as books that give the cultural, historical, and geographical background necessary for understanding the life of Mary as described in biblical texts)
  • Patristics and other works of historical theology (the writings of the Church Fathers and of medieval and post-Reformation theologians and saints abound in references to Mary even when they do not specifically focus on her)
  • Doctrine, papal and conciliar documents, catechisms (works containing, commenting on, or explaining the doctrine and teachings of the Church on Mariology or subjects related to it)
  • Christology and theological anthropology (works on the person of Christ and devotion toward him, as well as works on grace, salvation, and eschatology)
  • Ecclesiology and pneumatology (works on the theological understanding of the Church and the role of the Holy Spirit within it)
  • Spirituality (works on prayer, devotion, historical expressions of spirituality, and the spiritual writings of saints)
  • Liturgy (missals, breviaries, sacramental rituals, proper liturgies of various religious orders and Eastern rites)
  • Christian feminism (works providing philosophical or theological perspectives on women that form a backdrop for understanding Mary in her times and today)
  • Ecumenism and interreligious dialogue (works contextualizing similarities and differences of belief about Mary within Christianity and between Christianity and non-Christian religions, particularly Judaism and Islam)
  • Collected works of modern Catholic theologians who have made significant contributions to Marian studies
  • Histories, studies, rules, and constitutions of religious orders and lay groups that have a strong Marian charism
  • Non-theological books that demonstrably provide historical, cultural, literary, philosophical, psychological, or sociological perspectives for understanding the person of Mary

3. Collection management

For the reasons stated above, it will be necessary to conduct an ongoing review of the books and periodicals of the General Theological Books collection and to deselect works that do not fit within the criteria of this policy. It will also be necessary to apply these criteria carefully during the acquisition process.

Due to the potential overlap between this component of the Marian Library collection and works purchased by the Roesch Library to support the University’s Religious Studies program, it will be necessary for the two libraries to coordinate the acquisi-tion of new theological books. Except in rare cases, there should be no duplication of titles between the two libraries.

C. Art Books

The Marian Library has a well-developed collection of books directly related to the Virgin Mary as she is depicted in art and church architecture. The collection includes extensive holdings in Gothic, Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods, as well as iconography of Eastern Christianity to support research in Marian art and Mary in art.

The Marian Library selectively collects representative samples in this area, with a concentration on scholarly monographs with a strong Marian dimension. Acquisitions may include volumes on Marian art exhibits; popular devotional art or Catholic material culture; and contemporary Marian art.

The Marian Library may recommend to the Roesch Library art selector or the Associate Dean for Collections the purchase of supplementary art texts of value and interest that do not fit into the Marian Library’s current collecting parameters.

D. Periodicals

1. The current collection

The periodicals of the Marian Library can be classified into two broad categories:

a. Marian periodicals include periodicals in various languages focused on Marian theology, apparitions, shrines, and religious movements throughout the world. The collection presently includes two locally edited periodicals, Marian Studies and Marian Library Studies.

b. General periodicals include journals in theology and religious art, as well as those associated with the Vatican or with particular religious orders.

2. Ongoing collection interests

The Marian Library will continue to maintain subscriptions or accept donations of Marian periodicals. It will also continue to maintain subscriptions to its general periodicals, aside from those that are already held in the Roesch Library.

3. Collection management

The majority of the periodical titles held by the Marian Library are no longer active. Active subscriptions for periodicals need to be monitored closely since many journals of European origin have erratic publishing schedules.

E. Reference Collection

  • 1. The current collection
  • This component of the collection consists of reference works essential to Marian and Catholic theological studies, including:
  • Subject dictionaries
  • Encyclopedias and other multivolume sets
  • Proceedings of international Marian conferences
  • Complete runs of the most important Marian periodicals
  • Bibles and selected biblical commentaries
  • Official publications of the Catholic church
  • Copies of Marian books that are used frequently by IMRI students

It also includes:

  • Language dictionaries
  • Bibliographies and inventories that aid in the cataloging of rare books
  • Selected reference works on art

2. Ongoing collection interests

The Marian Library will seek to acquire, through purchase or donation, any new or updated reference works in the categories listed above with the special aim of supporting the research needs of IMRI faculty and students.

3. Collection management

The materials in the Reference Collection do not circulate and are housed in the Marian Library’s Reading Room. When the Marian Library adds a copy of a Marian book to the Reference Collection, it will generally maintain a second circulating copy in the stacks and in exceptional cases a third copy in remote storage.

All Marian reference works will be maintained in their print version; in the coming years, the Marian Library will decide whether to replace print versions of its other reference works with available electronic versions.

F. Juvenile Books

1. The current collection

The Marian Library maintains a circulating collection of children’s books. The works
are in various languages, and some are in unusual formats such as coloring books,
pop-up books, or books with puzzle pieces. They include works written specifically for
children or young adults in the following subject areas:

  • Events in the life of Mary, especially the birth of Jesus
  • The lives of figures closely associated with Mary
  • The rosary or other Marian devotions
  • Marian apparitions
  • Children’s bibles or prayer books
  • The holiday of Christmas, including international customs
  • Song books about Mary and/or Christmas

2. Ongoing collection interests

The Marian Library will continue to selectively acquire children’s books in the areas listed above, primarily through donation but occasionally through purchase.

3. Collection management

These books show how Mary is depicted in word and image to young people and are intended primarily for use by teachers, parish staff, and researchers in early education. The books may be loaned to adults for research purposes but are not to be loaned for use by children. Children may view the books only under the direct supervision of a library staff member in the Reading Room of the Marian Library.


The Brother William Fackovec, S.M., Rare Book Collection is named in honor of the late Brother Bill Fackovec, the librarian of the Marian Library from 1960 to 2011. He acquired many of the books in the collection during visits to rare-book dealers in Europe.

A. The current collection

The collection contains more than 6,200 volumes printed between 1500 and 1800. It also contains a small number of incunabula and illuminated manuscripts published before 1500 and a small number of first, limited, or specially bound editions of works published after 1800, including all vellum-bound books. The primary languages of the collection are Latin, Spanish, French, Italian, and English.

It currently contains works of the following types:

  • Theological treatises on Marian doctrine
  • Collections of sermons
  • Biblical commentaries
  • Histories of Marian shrines and apparitions
  • Biographies of Mary, Jesus Christ, or the saints
  • Works concerning Marian devotions
  • Little Offices of the Blessed Virgin Mary
  • Breviaries and missals
  • Works on religious orders with a strong Marian charism
  • Other works on miscellaneous Marian or theological topics

The Marian Library also houses the Clugnet Collection, a closed collection of approximately 6, 500 rare books and pamphlets on Marian shrines throughout the world. The materials in this collection were published between the mid-16th century and 1918. The Marian Library acquired them in 1954 from the estate of the collector, the French bibliographer Leon Clugnet.

B. Criteria for inclusion

Books that meet any of the following criteria (except those in the Clugnet Collection) will be added or transferred to the Brother William Fackovec, S.M., Rare Book Collection:

  • Bound illuminated manuscripts
  • All volumes published before 1801
  • First, limited, unique, or irreplaceable editions of works published after 1800
  • Books published after 1800 with special binding (including all vellum-bound books), fore-edge decorations, special illustrations, or other unique aesthetic features
  • Books published after 1800 whose replacement value exceeds $1,000, except reference works
  • Autographed works by significant authors

C. Ongoing collection interests

The Marian Library will seek to acquire additional rare books (defined as those that meet any of the above criteria) for the Brother William Fackovec, S.M., Rare Book Collection in the following subject areas:

  • Works relating to Marian scholarship or devotion, such as theological treatises, sermons, meditations, writings of saints on Mary, commentaries on biblical books having Marian relevance, and works on Marian shrines or apparitions.
  • Missals, breviaries, Little Offices, Books of Hours, or other prayer books having Marian relevance.
  • Rules and constitutions of religious orders with a strong Marian charism.

D. Collection management

The Marian Library possesses the Brother W. Roesch Rare Book Endowment, which can be used for the purchase of additional rare books for the collection. It also accepts donations of rare books in accordance with section VIIIb (Donations) below. The condition and preservation cost of rare books will be taken into consideration before acquiring them for the collection.

All materials in the Brother William Fackovec, S.M., Rare Book Collection and the Clugnet Collection are non-circulating. Materials from these collections are available for research in the Marian Library reading room.


The Marian Library has diverse collections of materials in various formats that require special equipment (i.e., a “medium” or its plural “media”) in order to access the information contained within them. These materials are broadly divided into three categories: sound recordings, video recordings/film, and digital files.

A. Sound recordings

1. The current collection

The current collection of sound recordings includes materials in a variety of formats including recording wire, records of various speeds and sizes, reel-to-reel tape, audio cassettes, and compact discs. It can be divided into two broad categories, namely recorded music and recordings of spoken word.

a. Recorded music

The Marian Library maintains a collection of recorded music with a Marian dimension. This includes classical music, Gregorian chant, chants of the Eastern Church, anthems and hymns, choir music, and popular/contemporary music.

This portion of the collection highlights the diversity of musical expressions of Marian devotion, and some of the materials support the IMRI courses Mary and Music and Marian hymnody.

b. Recordings of spoken word

The Marian Library also maintains a collection of recordings of the spoken word, including lectures by scholars on Marian, general theological, and scriptural topics, as well as Marian devotions such as recitations of the rosary. This collection also includes recordings of speeches given at academic conferences.

2. Criteria for inclusion and ongoing collection interests

a. Recorded music

The Marian Library will continue to selectively collect recorded music in the subject areas listed above, through purchase or donation, with compact discs as the preferred format. However, it will no longer accept donations of non-professional music recordings. Furthermore, it will not purchase or accept donations of recorded music in the following superseded formats: audio cassettes, records, recording wire, and reel-to-reel tape. Exceptions can be made for materials in superseded formats that are part of an archival collection with provenance.

b. Recordings of spoken word

Henceforth the Marian Library will be highly selective in collecting recordings of spoken word through purchase or donation and will no longer accept donations of non-professional recordings of lectures or conference talks. It also will not accept professional recordings of such talks if they are likely to be published at a later date. Furthermore, it will not purchase or accept donations of recordings of spoken word in the following superseded formats: audio cassettes, records, recording wire, and reel-to-reel tape. Exceptions can be made for materials in superseded formats that are part of an archival collection with provenance.

3. Collection management

Materials in CD or audio cassette format are circulating materials, while record albums, reel-to-reel tape, and recording wire are non-circulating. The Marian Library maintains the following working playback equipment for sound recordings: record player, cassette player, CD players. If there is risk of damage to materials, the Marian Library reserves the right to limit the use of playback equipment by patrons.

Brother Frank Deibel, S.M., compiled an inventory summarizing the content of each audio cassette in the collection. This inventory will be invaluable for future collection assessment of audio cassettes.

The Marian Library will de-accession any sound recordings that do not fit within the current collection policy parameters. It will attempt to migrate remaining sound recordings in superseded formats (especially audio cassettes) to a current format using the following plan:

a. Purchase a replacement copy in a current format when available.

b. Otherwise, use conversion equipment to update to a current format if copyright law permits. In some cases, copyright law would permit only the creation of a non-circulating preservation copy in a current format.

c. After migrating material from a superseded format to a current one, generally the original item in the superseded format will be discarded unless the original item contains valuable information that would be lost in the migration process or the original item has value in itself as an artifact.

B. Video recordings and film

1. The current collection

The current collection of video recordings and film includes materials in a variety of formats, such as video cassettes (VHS), DVDs, film reels, nitrate film, safety film, filmstrips, slides, microfilm, and microfiche. It can be divided into three broad categories: feature films, educational films, and still image film.

a. Feature films

The Marian Library maintains a collection of feature films, defined as motion pictures with a narrative structure and often for popular consumption. These films most often depict aspects of the lives of Jesus, Mary, and/or various saints associated with Mary; almost all of them have religious themes. Some of the materials in this collection support the IMRI course Mary and Film.

b. Educational films

The Marian Library also maintains a collection of educational films, defined as motion pictures designed to provide information on a particular topic. These films are usually in the form of documentaries or recorded lectures, and most address questions of Marian doctrine or apparitions, although some deal with general Christian or religious themes.

c. Still image film

The Marian Library also has collections of still image film, defined as images on film that can be viewed individually. The most prominent formats for this category are slides, filmstrips, microfilm, and microfiche. The slide collection consists primarily of images of prominent Marian paintings; the microfiche collection consists of periodical articles. The filmstrip collection consists primarily of catechetical materials. The microfilm collection has not yet been itemized.

2. Criteria for inclusion and ongoing collection interests

The Marian Library will continue to collect feature films and educational films in the subject areas listed above, through purchase or donation, with DVD as the preferred format. However it will no longer accept donations of non-professional video recordings, nor will it purchase or accept donations of video recordings or film in the following superseded formats: video cassette (VHS), film reels, nitrate film, safety film, filmstrips, and slides. Exceptions will be made for materials in superseded formats that are part of an archival collection with provenance. The Marian Library will evaluate potential additions to the microfilm or microfiche collections on a case-by-case basis.

3. Collection management

Materials in video cassette (VHS) and DVD formats are circulating materials, while slides, filmstrips, film reels, nitrate film, safety film, microfilm, and microfiche are non-circulating. The Marian Library maintains the following playback equipment for video recordings and film: VHS player, DVD player, slide projector, microfiche reader, and microfilm readers. If there is risk of damage to materials, the Marian Library reserves the right to limit the use of playback equipment by patrons.

The Marian Library will de-accession any video recordings that do not fit within the current collection policy parameters. It will attempt to migrate remaining video recordings in superseded formats (especially video cassettes) to a current format using the following plan:

a. Purchase a replacement copy in a current format when available.

b. Otherwise, use conversion equipment to update to a current format if copyright law permits. In some cases, copyright law would permit only the creation of a non-circulating preservation copy in a current format.

c. After migrating material from a superseded format to a current one, generally the original item in the superseded format will be discarded unless the original item contains valuable information that would be lost in the migration process or the original item has value in itself as an artifact.

C. Digital Files

1. The current collection

The Marian Library has a small number of digital files saved to the following media storage formats: floppy diskette, compact disc, CD-ROM. These digital files include computer programs, word processing files, and image files. Some of them are digital versions of print resources such as periodicals and bibliographies. The Marian Library currently archives a limited number of websites using a third-party, subscription-based content management system.

2. Criteria for inclusion and ongoing collection interests

Donations of digital files on storage media will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The Marian Library will actively seek to archive websites relating to Marian apparitions or other topics of interest.

3. Collection management

Media storage items containing digital files are non-circulating materials. These materials will need to be evaluated to determine the value of the content; if it is found to be of value to the collection, an attempt will be made to migrate these materials to a format compatible with current computer hardware and software.

Archived websites will be stored using a third-party, subscription-based content management system.


The Marian Library collects, preserves, and provides access to archival materials and special collections that support its mission. The objective is to physically and/or digitally preserve relevant materials of enduring historical value; encourage and facilitate on-site use; provide offsite access through selective digitization; promote original research in Marian studies; and contribute to the community and region through exhibits and programming. Archival collections can be found at https://archivescatalog.udayton.edu

A. Personal Papers, Manuscripts, and Records

1. Current collection

Personal papers, manuscripts, and records document the history, activities, research interests, and devotional practices of individuals, groups, and organizations with a significant Marian dimension. All of these collections are provenance-based. Examples of personal papers, manuscripts, and records currently in the collection are:

  • The Ecumenical Society of the Blessed Virgin Mary, United States Branch Records (1974-1998) contain meeting minutes, newsletters, presentation papers, pamphlets, and recorded lectures documenting the history and activities of the ESBVM/USA, a group that promotes ecumenical devotion and advances in the study of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
  • The Marianist magazine and Mary Today Records (1944-1968) contain meeting minutes, reports, marketing materials, and correspondence documenting the history and activities of the Marianist magazine (later Mary Today). This Catholic periodical was headquartered at the Marian Library from 1955 to 1967. It has been described as a “Marian digest”; it published images, news, articles, and commentary.
  • The Sally Cunneen Papers (1952-2009) contain correspondence, journals, presentation papers, recorded lectures, and research materials. The collection includes research and manuscripts for two of Mrs. Cunneen’s books, In Search of Mary: The Woman and the Symbol and Mother Church: What the Experience of Women is Teaching Her. The collection also documents her work as an English professor and her studies at Columbia University and Fordham University; it includes additional research and writing on Catholicism, the Blessed Virgin Mary, education, and women’s studies.
  • The Christine Mathieu Marian Holy Card Collection (1853-2001) contains nearly 2,000 Marian holy cards collected by Ms. Mathieu. The collection primarily includes cards from the late 19th century relating to Marian iconography and pictorial work, as well as French Marian titles, shrines, and prayers.

The Marian Library offers its services as a designated repository for organizational records and personal papers. The materials must be inactive upon transfer to the library; collections carrying no restrictions on access are preferred. The library is currently the designated repository for:

  • Records of the Mariological Society of America

2. Criteria for inclusion and collecting interests

The library acquires personal papers, manuscripts, and records with a significant Marian dimension. Collections may contain a broad range of formats including but not limited to paper documents, visual resources, audiovisual materials, artifacts, and digital formats.

To lessen the likelihood of deaccession, the library evaluates all donations before
accessioning them.

3. Collection management

Donations of personal papers, manuscripts, and records must be accompanied byan executed Deed of Gift per the Guidelines for the Donation Collections (see Appendices 2 and 3). In exceptional cases, collections may be considered for purchase. Donations and purchases of archival collections are carried out in accordance with the acquisition policies set forth in Section IX. Collections are arranged, described, preserved, and made accessible in accordance with current professional standards.

Personal papers, manuscripts, and records are non-circulating and available for use in the Marian Library’s reading room.

B. Special Research Collections

1. Current collection

Special research collections document a broad range of Marian topics including apparitions, shrines, titles, artistic representations of Mary, Marian spirituality, and Mary in Catholic material culture. Collections contain a variety of formats including but not limited to paper documents, visual resources, audiovisual materials, and artifacts.

2. Criteria for inclusion and collecting interests

For Special Research Collections, the Marian Library seeks to include quality materials that will enrich its holdings. Special Research Collections have open or closed status. Closed collections no longer accrue materials. The library accepts select materials for open collections such as those listed in Appendix 1.

In order to foster a reasonable equilibrium between collecting efforts and processing capabilities, specific selection criteria are applied to each collection and the types of items it may accrue. Factors considered during review can include research, artifact, and exhibition value; preservation considerations; space and resource limitations; duplication, obsolete or alternative formats; copyright restrictions; and existing comprehensive subject coverage.

3. Collection management

Accruing collections may be reappraised based on appraisal factors above in addition to the following: availability of storage space; identification of materials more appropriately located at another repository; and/or general reevaluation of the collection’s worthiness for continuing to accrue materials. Reappraisal will also include consultation with relevant parties. Open collections that have been reappraised and are being considered for closure will be managed through the following process:

a. Evaluation by the Marian Library Faculty (consisting of all Librarians and Archivists working in the Marian Library).

b. If the Marian Library Faculty determines that the status of a collection should change from open to closed, it will then make this recommendation (accompanied by supporting rationale) to the Dean of University Libraries, and IMRI Director(s).

c. The Marian Library Faculty, the Dean of University Libraries, and the IMRI Director(s) will make a decision on the collection’s status.

d. If the aforementioned group determines that a collection will change from open to closed, this decision will be communicated to Marian Library and IMRI staff by the Director of the Marian Library.

e. All changes in collection status will be reflected in Appendix 1 upon final approval.

Special Research Collections may be deaccessioned in accordance with the guidelines set forth in Section X.

Significant donations must be accompanied by an executed Deed of Gift per the Guidelines for Donation of Special Collections (see Appendices 2 and 3). Exceptional items may be considered for purchase. Donations and purchases of items for Special  Research Collections are carried out in accordance with Section IX.

Special Research Collections are non-circulating and available for use in the Marian Library’s reading room.


A. Collection Description

The Sacred Art and Artifacts Collection includes Marian art, artifacts, and visual resources that support the teaching, research, and outreach missions of the Marian Library. The current collection contains more than 14,000 pieces in a variety of media including drawings, photography, paintings, sculpture, prints, textiles, and mixed media.

The Library has made a special effort to collect works by Marianists including Joseph Barrish, Cletus Behlmann, Mel Meyer and others. Lay artists represented in the collection include Edward (Ned) Ostendorf, Jan Oliver-Schultz, Patrick Pye, Robert Koepnick, Margaret Werlinger, and Holly Schapker. The collection is divided into three categories:

1. Framed and unframed flat art

Flat art has been collected for teaching, research, outreach and aesthetic purposes. The collection primarily includes art that depicts the Blessed Virgin Mary and also includes works on other religious subjects. Mediums include oil, watercolor, charcoal, acrylic, prints, textiles, and mixed media.

2. Three-dimensional art

Statues, sculptures, and artifacts have been collected for teaching, research, outreach and aesthetic purposes. The collection primarily includes art that depicts the Blessed Virgin Mary and also includes works on other religious subjects. Mediums include porcelain, ceramic, plaster, glass, plastic, and mixed media.

3. Nativity works

Nativity works (crèches) are collected primarily for outreach and aesthetic purposes. The current collection contains over 3,600 Nativity sets and more than 500 Nativity-related ornaments, figures, textiles, and ephemera. More than 200 countries are represented. Mediums include but are not limited to ceramic, porcelain, wood, textiles, fiber, metal, and paper.

B. CRITERIA FOR ACCESSIONING

The Marian Library continues to develop its collection, accessioning items to close gaps in existing collections and items deemed to have high research and display value. Due to budgetary limitations and the fact that the collection grows primarily by donation, the collection's strongest area is in Marian art from the nineteenth century to the present. Art from eras and places not currently represented would enhance the work we do with this collection. In particular, the Marian Library acquires art that

  • Highlights Marian history, culture, and spirituality
  • Demonstrates the global reach of Marian devotion and symbolism
  • Promotes Marianist spirituality
  • Is of high quality

The Library uses the following guidelines for art accessioning:

1. The Marian Library may accession donated art, artifacts, collections, or other objects if they will support curricular or co-curricular offerings, enhance the Library’s ability to curate exhibits, relate to a work or works in exhibits collections, and/or have exceptional research value.

2. The Marian Library may accession donated art works if they have a strong Marian dimension and are deemed suitable for public display based on aesthetic quality, visual integration with the design of campus, and potential to enhance the University’s visual environment.

3. Other considerations include suitability for exhibition; fragility of materials; conservation issues; storage requirements; and cost of housing and managing the potential acquisition

4. Due to space and funding constraints, additions to the crèche collection are limited to donations of exceptionally fine pieces and/or sets from countries not yet represented or in formats not already held.

C. PROCEDURES FOR ACCESSIONING

Generally, acquisitions of art occurs through donation, not purchase. Any potential donor identifying a potential acquisition should provide the Librarian for Visual Resources with detailed written descriptions of the items accompanied by photographs. The Librarian for Visual Resources will review the potential acquisition and, for major additions to the collection, make recommendations to the Director of the Marian Library and the Dean of University Libraries. A decision to accession collections with more than five pieces or likely to have a value greater than $1,000 require the approval of the Dean of University Libraries. Due consideration will be given to the financial and staffing commitments required for the preservation, exhibition, storage, and protection (including insurance) of the items proposed for acquisition. Archival materials, books, or other materials that accompany a potential donation of sacred art shall be reviewed according to the guidelines set forth in the appropriate section of this policy. Decisions to accept these materials will be made by the Director of the Marian Library in consultation with other library personnel.

Items accepted for donation to the Marian Library are permanent gifts to the collection. For all gifts the University Libraries will provide the donor(s) with a deed of gift outlining the terms of acceptance and the date of receipt (see Appendix 3). The donor’s signature on the deed of gift will transfer title to the Marian Library. The Director of the Marian Library also will sign the deed of gift and return a copy to the donor. As agreed during the transfer process, the Libraries reserve the right to dispose of or return any items that do not fall under collection criteria and guidelines in use at the time of acquisition.

The University Libraries do not provide, either verbally or in writing, appraisals of donated materials. Appraisals for income tax purposes must be obtained by the donor from other sources.

It is the responsibility of the Director of the Marian Library to work with UD’s Advancement division to ensure that all gifts are processed, recorded, and acknowledged according to University policy and procedure, regardless of monetary value.

1. Accessioning five or fewer works by gift, bequest, or purchase with a total value less than $1,000 is considered in the realm of a minor acquisition:

Minor acquisitions (objects or collections) will be managed by the Director of Research and Special Projects in consultation with the Director of the Marian Library and the Executive Director of IMRI, with semiannual reports made to the Dean of University Libraries. A detailed description of the object or objects and a photograph are necessary for consideration.

2. Accessioning significant individual works or collections::

The Librarian for Visual Resources, Director of the Marian Library and the Dean of University Libraries will review all major acquisitions for addition to the collection. All major donations or purchases require the approval of the Dean of University Libraries. Outside experts may advise on the value or condition of any collection prior to acceptance. A detailed description of the collection is required to make an assessment, and the Librarian for Visual Resources should see and evaluate potential acquisitions before making recommendations for accessioning

Large acquisitions require careful consideration due to space and staffing issues. All proposed donations will be assessed to determine whether their accessioning will incur significant expenses related to their organization, care, display, and storage. Potential donors will be encouraged to consider funding the initial processing and long-term care of the collection. Any object under consideration must be suitable for exhibition or able to be made so with a reasonable conservation plan.

D. BEQUESTS OF SACRED ART

Bequests will receive the same consideration as any other potential addition to the collection. Upon notification that the Marian Library is a beneficiary, the appropriate personnel will obtain a copy of the will or a copy of the section that outlines the bequest. Photographs and detailed descriptions of the items will be delivered to the Dean of University Libraries. The Dean, the Director of the Marian Library, and the Librarian for Visual Resources will review the bequest and make a decision. Acceptance of a bequest requires the approval of the Dean of University Libraries. The Libraries may recommend that the collection or object(s) be sold. Upon approval from University Advancement, proceeds from the sale can be put toward continuing care and maintenance of the Marian Library Sacred Art or Crèche Collections.

E. DEACCESSION OF SACRED ART

Occasionally, the Librarian for Visual Resources will review the Sacred Art and Artifacts Collections for their relevance to the mission of the Marian Library and their alignment with the Collection Development Policy and to assess the benefit to the Libraries and the University from their continued management and care. Occasional deaccessioning helps the Library to ensure the integrity and relevance of the collections.

Works of sacred art are deaccessioned only after rigorous scrutiny and as a result of a deliberate decision to refine the holdings. All deaccessions must be reviewed and approved by the Director of the Marian Library.

Considerations for deaccession may include the following:

  • Consistency with the criteria outlined in the Collection Development and Management Policy;
  • The impact of the deaccession on the quality of the collection;
  • The quality of the objects;
  • The ability of the objects to serve the educational, research, and outreach functions of the Marian Library;
  • Presence of duplicate or redundant objects;
  • Condition of objects, i.e., damage or deterioration beyond reasonable repair;
  • Available space for proper storage and care of the objects;
  • Questions of authenticity or provenance

F. ACCESS AND USE OF SACRED ART

The collection facilitates the study of the relationship between religion and culture and supports learning and scholarship by means of exhibits, instruction, and research on Marian art. It also promotes pastoral endeavors fostering Marian spirituality and is an outreach mechanism to campus and the region. To this end, the Marian Library makes available a variety of traveling exhibits for rental to museums, galleries, colleges, parishes, and other institutions. The Marian Library also loans art for display in University departments. The Marian Library hosts several exhibits each year in its gallery spaces. Classes and researchers are welcome to use Marian art for instruction, scholarship, and inspiration; however, since there is currently only an internal catalog it is necessary to consult with library personnel to identify materials from this collection. Work is underway to improve this catalog and eventually provide more public-facing information about the Marian Library’s art holdings.


A. Purchases

The Marian Library actively purchases books, periodicals, media materials, and occasionally works of sacred art or archival collections in accordance with the collection development parameters defined above and within the limitations of its annual acquisitions endowment. As a member of the University Libraries, the Marian Library will not seek to acquire materials that are already contained in the Roesch Library or the U.S. Catholic Special Collection unless the needs of students, faculty, or researchers warrant such duplication.

B. Donations

The Marian Library welcomes donations that enhance its existing collections and fall within the scope of this policy. All donations are reviewed based on the criteria in this policy and the resources required for processing and preservation before being added to the collection. The Marian Library invites donors to consider providing ancillary financial support for such costs.

Prospective donors should refer to the Guidelines for Acceptance of Donations and Deed of Gift (Appendices 2 and 3). Gifts of sacred art are covered in Section VIII. Those interested in donating materials are encouraged to discuss potential gifts with the Marian Library prior to deposit.

Donations are accepted with the donor’s knowledge that all materials become the property of the Marian Library. Donors will receive a formal letter of acknowledgment. Archival collections or significant donations must be accompanied by a signed Deed of Gift (Appendix 3). The Marian Library does not provide appraisals or estimates of monetary value for gifts. Any donor wishing to have his or her materials appraised for monetary value must do so before transferring them to the Marian Library.

Items deposited but not accessioned may be offered to other library collections, religious or non-profit organizations, or booksellers; or, they may be discarded at the library’s discretion.


The Marian Library conducts ongoing assessment of its entire collection. Materials that do not fall within the scope of the Collection Development and Management Policy may  be withdrawn. Materials accompanied by a Deed of Gift shall be evaluated according the provisions indicated therein.

The Marian Library Faculty shall review the Collection Development and Management Policy as needed, taking into consideration the academic curriculum, available resources, and best practices for special libraries and archival collections. The Marian Library Faculty submits proposed revisions to the Dean of University Libraries for review and approval.

On rare occasions when the mission and greater good of the Marian Library warrant exceptions to provisions listed in the Collection Management and Development Policy, the Dean of University Libraries, the Executive Director of IMRI, or the Director of the Marian Library may make such exceptions on a case-by-case basis. All exceptions made to the policy to acquire an item or collection having major resource implications should be considered at a meeting of the Marian Library Faculty, the Dean of University Libraries, and the IMRI Director(s) prior to acquisition.

Revised Jan. 18, 2018

Special Research Collections listed below are examples of topic or format based collections that continue to accrue select materials.Archival collections can be found at archivescatalog.udayton.edu. Donations of original items that enhance the existing collection will be considered for inclusion. Please review Section VII B., Special Research Collections and Section IX B, Donations prior to discussing a potential donation with the Marian Library.

ML.031 Marian holy card collection

Collection includes holy cards depicting the Blessed Virgin Mary, Madonna and Child, events in the life of Jesus and Mary, Marian titles, and Marian shrines. ‘Holy cards’ may include sacramental cards such as ordination and first communion cards, souvenir cards from Marian shrines, ‘in memoriam’ cards, membership cards, and handmade devotional cards. Materials in the collection may have been used by Catholics in private devotion, purchased as souvenirs, or distributed to commemorate a Catholic sacrament or occasion. Holy cards are approximately 2.5” x 4.5”, and represent a variety of artistic styles and techniques including lithography and die-cut paper lace. Cards may be printed on paper, cloth, or vellum. Cards may contain text, prayer, or handwritten notes on the verso. The majority of holy cards in the collection were printed in Europe from circa 1860 to circa 1950.

Accruals to this format collection should have a significant Marian dimension and meet one or more of the following criteria:

1. Unique or rare expressions of the holy card format such as those printed on vellum or silk and handcrafted cards;

2. Document Marian titles and shrines without substantial coverage;

Note that priority is given to historic cards (printed prior to 1960) although more recent cards may be considered for inclusion.

ML.035 Marian apparitions collection

Collection contains correspondence, personal accounts, articles, newsletters, photographs, audio recordings, artifacts, and ephemera documenting reported Marian apparitions in the United States and around the world. The collection primarily includes material related to apparitions in the 20th century from circa 1980 to circa 2000. The collection contains some material dealing with the major, approved Marian apparitions (for example, Fátima and Lourdes), but its focus is documentation of the hundreds of reported apparitions that are mostly unapproved.

Accruals to this topical collection should have a significant Marian dimension and meet one or more of the following criteria:
 

1. Original correspondence, photographs, artifacts and other material documenting reported Marian apparitions;

Original materials documenting topics (such as events or individuals) without existing coverage.

ML.037 Marian sheet music collection

Collection contains print music with a Marian dimension, including but not limited to hymns, mass settings, choral pieces, and Christmas carols. Most items in the collection are what would be termed “sheet music”—single songs for one part. However, some multisong compilations, full orchestral scores, or other longer pieces have been retained in the collection for their historic value. A bulk of the collection dates from the 1860s to present.

Accruals to this format collection should have a significant Marian dimension and meet one or more of the following criteria:

1. Single song as opposed to a multiple song compilation;

2. Not be better served by a bibliographic record in the library catalog, for instance, in the case of long works.

Note that this collection is not limited to historic works. Current publications of Marian sheet music will be considered for inclusion.


Revised Jan. 18, 2018

These guidelines outline appropriate procedures and documentation for the acquisition of special collections for the University Libraries.

Overview

Donations should be well documented to preserve the provenance and custodial history of collections and to provide evidence of legal ownership. All significant donations should be executed with a deed of gift. It is also necessary to record donor contact information and the names and contact information for anyone serving as an agent for the donor. In cases where materials may accrue, a single deed of gift establishes the transfer of ownership for the collection. Subsequent additions to that collection should be recorded on an accrual form and signed by the donors and an archivist or librarian working on behalf of the University.

The following forms are recommended for all significant donations and should be filed together:

  • Deed of Gift (to be customized as necessary)
  • Donor Information Form
  • Accrual Form (when additional materials are subsequently donated)

Deeds of Gift

A deed of gift is a formal legal agreement between a donor and the University and establishes the transfer of ownership of materials, and usually the transfer of rights to the materials. The deed of gift helps to establish trust and common understanding about the gift arrangements and each party’s rights once the transfer is complete.

A deed of gift should be used to document donation of materials when any of the following conditions apply:

  • The donation is a discrete collection of original archival material
  • Literary or copyrights are involved
  • The materials have high intrinsic value

The dean of the University Libraries should sign the deed of gift for significant donations, such as large collections or collections of high intrinsic value. Only for very rare gifts should University of Dayton President, Eric F. Spina, or other University administrators be asked to sign the deed of gift.

During conversations with donors prior to signing the deed of gift, it is important to mention that the University Libraries cannot make assurances that the collection will be permanently held by the University, although that should be the intent at the time of donation. Were the repository’s collecting focus to change in the future, it is within the rights of the University Libraries to transfer collections to other appropriate repositories or to otherwise dispose of deaccessioned materials.

Involving University Advancement

University Advancement manages relationships with the University’s donors and potential donors, and therefore needs to be informed about new and potential donors. For this reason, Advancement should always be notified of gifts to the Libraries. For all donations, large and small, Advancement staff record gifts to the University and send official acknowledgements.

Small gifts should be recorded and sent to Advancement with the Libraries’ monthly gift
donation report.

For larger donations, such as donations of significant collections, Advancement should be notified that the donation process is beginning. Advancement staff members are available
to visit donors with Library staff and to participate in conversations with the donor. If
circumstances warrant it, they are able to approach donors about the possibility of monetary donations to accompany collections.

Donation files

The paperwork created during the donation process, including the signed deed of gift, donor information form, and any accruals forms, should be centrally filed within each collecting repository of the Libraries. These donation files may include relevant correspondence, news clippings, or other documents pertaining to the donation and the donor’s relationship with UD. These files are critically important to the continued care and curation of the collections.


Revised Jan. 18, 2018

The Marian Library Deed of Gift requests the following information:

I. Gift Intentions

I, [donor name], the undersigned donor of [city and state], do hereby represent as follows:

(a) to the best of my knowledge as the donor, I am the owner of the [collection name] (hereinafter “the Collection”) more fully described below and/or in Attachment A, including any copyright and/or associated intellectual property rights such as I possess;

(b) to the best of my knowledge, there are no liens, encumbrances or other limitations that affect the Collection or the donor’s ability to transfer the Collection, except as described more fully in Section III below.

[Donor name] hereby give and grant to the University of Dayton the collection as a donation for such scholarly and educational purposes as the University shall determine. The Collection will be held and maintained in the Marian Library of the University of Dayton Libraries.

II. Collection Description

III. Gift Arrangement and Conditions

Any literary rights and copyrights such as the donors may possess in this property are hereby deeded to the University of Dayton.

IV. Use of the Collection

The Collection shall be open for research to the public and the University community, without restrictions, unless stated as follows: ____________________

The Libraries may store, preserve, protect, and display the gift in accordance with standard archive or special collection practices; may organize, catalog, digitize and/or create a guide to the gift in accordance with the Library’s practices and standard library, archive, or special collection practices.

V. Deselected/Deaccessioned Materials

Donor acknowledges that the Marian Library reserves the right to refuse and/or deaccession materials that are routine, duplicative, or outside of the collecting scope of the repository. While serious consideration is given to these decisions, the Marian Library may refuse and/or deaccession materials at its sole discretion. Please check one of the following:

  • The Marian Library may dispose of any materials not selected for permanent retention.
  • The Marian Library shall offer to return deselected materials to Donor; however, if Donor does not accept such materials within 90 days of their being tendered to it, the Marian Library may dispose of them.

VI. Complete Agreement/Modification

This document and attachment(s) is a complete written agreement between the Donor and the University of Dayton which may only be modified by mutual written agreement.

VII. Governing Law

The parties recognize that the governing law for this agreement is that of the State of Ohio. In full accord with the provisions of this Deed of Gift, I am: [donor signature(s) and date]

I hereby certify that the Marian Library of the University of Dayton Libraries has received and accepted the above described items. [Director of the Marian Library signature and date].


Approved July 2, 2015 by Marian Library Administrative Council (consisting of the Dean of University Libraries, the Executive Director of IMRI, and the Marian Library Faculty).

Minor revisions, approved Sept. 29, 2017 and Oct. 5, 2017 by Marian Library Faculty, and by the Dean of the University Libraries on Jan. 18, 2018.


CONTACT

Marian Library


300 College Park
Dayton, Ohio 45469 - 1390
937-229-4214
Email