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Department of Electro-Optics and Photonics

M.S. & Ph.D. in Electro-Optics

Plan of Study

University Catalog for Electro-Optics (M.S., Ph.D.)

Course Information

Catalog description: Introduction to research methods, laboratory safety, ethics, proposal writing, technical presentations. 0 cr. hr.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into EO program or permission of chair.

Instructor: Mikhail Vorontsov, mvorontsov1@udayton.edu

Syllabus:

  1. Introduction to EOP and the University of Dayton
  2. MS & PhD program overview, courses, objectives and expectations; Plan of study.
  3. Library and online research resources
  4. Title IX, community, inclusion
  5. Laboratory safety
  6. Technical writing
  7. Copyright issues, plagiarism and academic honor code
  8. Intellectual property, disclosures and rights
  9. Research funding
  10. How to make effective technical presentations

Catalog description: Foundation of geometrical optics, Gaussian optics, paraxial raytracing, aperture stops and pupils, first-order optical design of basic optical instruments, optical materials, chromatic aberrations, third-order monochromatic aberrations, introduction to computer-based ray tracing, optical design of elementary optical components. 3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the graduate EOP department or permission of the department chair.

Instructor: Thomas Weyrauch, tweyrauch1@udayton.edu

Textbook: No formal textbook required, but the course follows roughly and uses the notation and nomenclature of Geometrical Optics and Optical Design by Mouroulis and Macdonald. 

References:

  • P. Mouroulis and J. Macdonald, Geometrical Optics and Optical Design, Oxford University Press, New York, 1997.
  • J. E. Greivenkamp, Field Guide to Geometrical Optics, SPIE Press, Bellingham, 2004
  • W. J. Smith, Modern Optical Engineering, SPIE Press, Bellingham, 2008.

Syllabus:

  1. Foundation of Geometrical Optics: Waves, wavefronts, and rays; Propagation of wavefronts, Reflection, Refraction; Fermat’s principle; Basic postulates of geometrical optics
  1. Elementary Ray Optics: Reflecting and refracting plane surfaces; Graphical ray tracing for thin lenses and mirrors. 
  1. Imaging by Single Surfaces and a Thin Lenses: Sign convention; Paraxial approximation; Conjugate equation, power, and focal length of surfaces, spherical mirrors, thin lenses; Imaging of extended objects, lateral, longitudinal, and visual magnifications
  2. Gaussian Optics: Paraxial height & angle variables; Paraxial ray tracing for systems of many surfaces; Matrix methods; Power and focal length of a general system; Cardinal points (principal planes, focal and nodal points); Thick lenses; Two-component systems; Afocal systems.
  3. Optical System Pre-design: Aperture stop, entrance and exit pupils; Numerical aperture and F-number; Depth of focus and depth of field; Paraxial marginal and principal rays; Locating stops and pupils; Telecentricity; Delano diagrams; Lagrange invariant; Etendue; Vignetting
  4. Gaussian Optics of Optical Instruments and Components: Visual telescopes; Field lenses; Microscope, Visual magnification, magnifying power and resolution; The eye; Reflecting prisms
  5. Chromatic Effects: Optical glass; Dispersion; Sellmeier equation; Abbe V-number; Dispersing prisms; Chromatic aberration; Achromatic doublet. 
  6. Monochromatic Point Aberrations: Wavefront and ray aberrations; Image quality and Strehl ratio; Wavefront expansion; Spot diagrams; Classical aberration types 
  7. Monochromatic Field Aberrations: Wave aberration polynomial for rotationally symmetric systems; Seidel aberration coefficients; Aplanatic meniscus; Astigmatism and Field Curvature; Petzval theorem; Aberrations of a thin lens in air: shape factor, stop-shift effects; Landscape lens
  8. Computer-based ray tracing: Introduction to OSLO software; Paraxial Setup and ray analysis; Seidel coefficients; Through-focus spot diagrams; Introduction to optimization: landscape lens and achromatic doublet.

Catalog description: Classical and quantum mechanical description of light-matter interaction; electromagnetic waves; polarization; dipole radiation; interaction of radiation with electrons; crystal optics; electro-optic effect; Fermi’s golden rule; absorption and dispersion. 3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the graduate EOP department or permission of the department chair.

Instructor: Andy Chong, achong1@udayton.edu

Textbook: No formal textbook; course notes will be used as the textbook.

References:

  • D. J. Griffith, Introduction to electrodynamics 4th edition, Addison-Wesley, Boston, MA, 2012.
  • G. R. Fowles, Introduction to modern optics 2nd edition, Dover, Mineola, NY, 1989.
  • B. E. A. Saleh and M. C. Teich, Fundamentals of photonics 2nd edition, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 2007
  • A. Yariv and P. Yeh, Optical waves in crystals, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 2003

Syllabus:

  1. Review of electromagnetic wave: Maxwell’s equations, Plane wave solution, Phase and group velocity, Poynting theorem
  2. Polarization of light: State of polarization, Jones matrices, Stoke parameters, Poincaré’s sphere, polarization devices
  3. Radiation and Scattering: Potential theory of electromagnetism, Radiation from dipole, Scattering by a dipole 
  4. Absorption and line broadening: Extinction by a dipole, Propagation in a dilute medium, Broadening
  5. Macroscopic electrodynamics: Macroscopic Maxwell’s equations, Dielectric tensor, Electromagnetic wave equation, Reflection and transmission at an interface
  6. Crystal optics: Polarizer, Birefringence, Optical activity, Faraday effect
  7. Electro-optic effects: EO effects, EO retardation, EO amplitude modulation, EO phase modulation
  8. Optical properties of metals: Drude model

Catalog description: 2D linear systems and Fourier transforms; analysis of diffraction using transfer function, impulse response and transport of intensity; optical elements for imaging and Fourier transformation; transfer functions of coherent and incoherent systems, design of complex spatial filters and holograms; optical information processing; 3D imaging. 3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the graduate EOP department or permission of the department chair.

Instructor: Partha Banerjee, pbanerjee1@udayton.edu

Text: Introduction to Fourier Optics, 3rd ed., Goodman

References: 

  1. Principles of Applied Optics, Banerjee and Poon; 
  2. Contemporary Optical Image Processing with MATLAB, Poon and Banerjee; 
  3. Class notes

Syllabus:

  1. 2D signals and systems; 2D Fourier transforms
  2. Transfer function and impulse response of propagation
  3. Examples of Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction; Gaussian beams
  4. Transport of intensity and phase
  5. Lenses and mirrors for imaging and Fourier transformation
  6. Transfer functions of coherent and incoherent imaging systems
  7. Analysis and design of complex spatial filters and holograms
  8. 3D imaging using holography and transport of intensity 
  9. Contemporary topics in optical signal and image processing

Catalog Description: Light propagation in slab and cylindrical waveguides; signal degradation in optical fibers; optical sources, detectors, and receivers; coupling; transmission link analysis; fiber fabrication and cabling; fiber sensor system. 3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite: EOP 502 or permission of department chair.

Instructor: Imad Agha, iagha1@udayton.edu

Textbook: C. R. Pollock, Fundamentals of Optoelectronics, Richard Irwin Inc., 1995. (out of print but an electronic copy will be given to the class), or C. R. Pollock, and M. Lipson Integrated Photonics, Springer; Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 2004 edition.

Text Notes: Will be handed out in class.

Reference Texts:

  • Gerd Keiser, Optical Fiber Communications, 4th Ed., McGraw Hill, New York, 2011.
  • Amnon Yariv and Pochi Yeh, Photonics, Sixth Ed., Oxford University Press Inc. 2007.
  • Dietrich Marcuse, Theory Of Dielectric Optical Waveguides, 2nd Ed. Academic Press Inc. 1991.
  • A. Snyder, and J. Love, Optical Waveguide Theory, Springer; 1st  Ed. 1983.
  • A. H. Cherin, An Introduction To Optical Fibers, McGraw Hill, New York, 1983.

Syllabus:

  1. Introduction
  2. Review of Maxwell’s equations
  3. Planar slab waveguide
  4. Dispersion in waveguides
  5. Graded index waveguides and the WKB method
  6. Step index circular waveguides
  7. Dispersion in step index and graded index fibers
  8. Attenuation in optical fibers
  9. Rectangular dielectric waveguide
  10. Coupled Mode theory and applications
  11. Coupling between optical sources and waveguides

Catalog description: Laser theory; coherence; Gaussian beams; optical resonators; properties of atomic and molecular radiation; laser oscillation and amplification; methods of excitation of lasers; characteristics of common lasers; laser applications. 3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): EOP 502 or a working knowledge of Maxwell's Equations and physical optics, calculus and linear algebra, or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Qiwen Zhan, qzhan1@udayton.edu

Textbook: Christopher Davis, Lasers and Electro-optics: Fundamentals and Engineering, Cambridge (1996).

References: 

  • Amnon Yariv, Optical Electronics in Modern Communications, 5th Edition, Oxford Univ. Press (1997)
  • William Silfvast, Laser Fundamentals, 2nd Edition, Cambridge University Press, (2004)

Syllabus:

  1. Introduction and laser safety
  2. Analysis of Optical Systems
  3. Optics of Gaussian Beam
  4. Optical Resonators
  5. Optical Frequency Amplification
  6. Optical Resonators Containing Amplifying Media
  7. Characteristics of Laser Radiation
  8. Control of Laser Oscilators

Catalog Description: Solid state theory of optoelectronic devices; semiconductor photoemitters: LEDs, optical amplifiers and semiconductor lasers; photodetectors: PIN, APD, photocells, PMT, detection and noise; solar cells; cameras and displays; electro-optic and magneto-optic devices; integration and application of electro-optical components in systems of various types. 3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the graduate EOP department or permission of the department chair.

Instructor: Andrew Sarangan, sarangan@udayton.edu

Textbook: Course notes by Andrew Sarangan.

Syllabus:

  1. Optical properties of materials
  2. Basic semiconductor properties
  3. PN junction diodes
  4. Light emitting diodes and fiber coupling
  5. Semiconductor optical amplifiers and fiber amplifiers
  6. Diode Lasers – Fabry-perot, DFB, VCSELs
  7. Photodetectors – junction detectors, photoconductors, avalanche detectors
  8. Noise in detection systems
  9. Solar photovoltaic devices
  10. Image Sensors – CCD & CMOS sensors, IR imagers
  11. Electro-Optic Devices – Mach-Zehnder modulators
  12. Liquid crystal devices – displays, spatial light modulators
  13. Diffraction Grating
  14. Electro-Optic Systems – CD pickup units, barcode scanners.

Catalog description: Discussion, inquiry and feedback of research progress towards a thesis in electro-optics and photonics; review of background research literature; discussion of experimental or computation methods and results; presentation of research progress reports; review of laboratory safety protocols; participation in technical conferences and professional workshops and/or Stander Symposium. 0 cr. hrs.

Instructor: TBD

Syllabus:

Same as catalog description. The objective of this course is to ensure that MS students enrolled in the thesis option regularly meet with their advisers, attend research meetings and make progress in their chosen research area.


Catalog description: Fundamental principles of optical thin film design and interference filters including: single-layer and multi-layer anti-reflection designs; High-reflection multilayer designs; Broadband reflectors; High-pass & low-pass filters; Line filters; Bandpass filters; Metal film designs; Design methods for oblique incidence; Thin film beam splitters; Numerical methods and optimization; Thin film manufacturing methods. 3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): A background in electromagnetics, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Andrew Sarangan, sarangan@udayton.edu

Textbook: Course notes by Andrew Sarangan. 

Syllabus:

  1. Transfer matrix method
  2. Single- and multi-layer antireflection design
  3. High reflection designs 
  4. Equivalent index method
  5. Edge filters
  6. Line filters
  7. Bandpass filters
  8. Metal film optics
  9. Thin films for oblique incidence
  10. Polarization control
  11. Optical thin film materials and their properties
  12. Phase change materials
  13. Production methods

Catalog description: Basic principles of processes used in microelectronic and photonic device fabrication: vacuum systems, plasma processes, physical and chemical vapor deposition, properties of silicon and other substrate materials, photolithography and non-optical lithography, wet chemical and plasma etching, thermal oxidation of silicon, semiconductor doping, ion implantation, metallization, electrical contacts and micro-metrology. 3 cr. hrs.

Instructor: Andrew Sarangan, sarangan@udayton.edu

Textbook: “Nanofabrication: Principles to Laboratory Practice”, Andrew Sarangan, CRC Press.

Syllabus:

  • Cleanrooms for device fabrication
  • Fundamentals of Vacuum
  • Fundamentals of Plasmas for Device Fabrication
  • Physical and Chemical Vapor Deposition
  • Substrate Materials
  • Lithography
  • Wet Chemical Etching
  • Plasma Etching
  • Doping, Surface Modification and Metal Contacts
  • Micro-metrology

Catalog description: Geometric optics; characterization of optical elements; diffraction; interference; birefringence and polarization. Audit is not permitted. 1 cr. hr.

Prerequisite(s): EOP 501 or permission of program chair.

Instructor: Cong Deng, cdeng1@udayton.edu

Textbook: There is no formal textbook required for this course. The laboratory exercises are based on the set of notes developed by Gordon Little, Bradley Duncan, and Nick Miller. 

References: 

  • Born and Wolf, Principles of Optics, Cambridge University Press, 1999.
  • Goodman, Introduction to Fourier Optics, Roberts and Company Publishers, 2004.
  • Hecht, Optics, Addison-Wesley, 2001.
  • Miller, Geometric and Physical Optics Laboratory Course Documentation and Lab Manual.

Syllabus:

  1. Modulation transfer function (MTF) of a pinhole camera. 
  2. Focal length of lenses: Investigate and evaluate several techniques for determining the focal length of a lens with emphasis on experimental measurement uncertainty and error analysis.
  3. Simple Optical Systems: Investigate the properties of a Gaussian beam expander and an optical relay system.
  4. The Airy disc and Fraunhofer Diffraction: Study the Airy disc, the diffraction limit of lenses and Fraunhofer diffraction from slit apertures.
  5. Fresnel diffraction:  Study the Fresnel diffraction irradiance pattern from an opaque line stop.
  6. Polarization: Study several aspects of polarization including: linear polarizers, retarders, birefringent materials, Fresnel reflection, and Brewster's Law.
  7. Interferometry and temporal coherence: Study the temporal coherence of conventional and laser sources using two-beam interferometers.

Catalog description: Fiber optic principles and systems: numerical aperture, loss, dispersion, single and multimode fibers, communications and sensing systems. Project oriented investigations of electro-fiber-optic systems and devices in general: sources, detectors, image processing, sensor instrumentation and integration, electro-optic component, display technology, nonlinear optical devices and systems. 1 cr. hr.

Prerequisite(s): EOP 514 or permission of program chair.

Instructor: Andrew Sarangan, sarangan@udayton.edu 

Text: There is no formal textbook required for this course. The laboratory exercises are based on the set of notes developed by Andrew Sarangan. 

Syllabus:

  1. Multimode fibers: basic fiber handling, cleaving, inspecting, measuring the numerical aperture and coupling light
  2. Multimode fibers: fusion splicing techniques, measuring splice losses of multimode fibers, light coupling and coupling efficiency calculations
  3. Single mode fibers: examining the mode patterns of different diameter fibers, light coupling, calculating V numbers and cut-off wavelengths. 
  4. Diffraction gratings: Review of basic principles, measuring the grating periods of grooved gratings, applications in spectroscopy
  5. Fiber Bragg Gratings: properties of FBG, measuring the reflection spectrum using a tunable laser, applications as a temperature or strain gauge, working with an optical spectrum analyzer.
  6. Photodetectors, Laser Diodes and LEDs: measuring the I-V and L-I curves, measuring responsivity and quantum efficiency, band gaps of materials.
  7. Project based on Erbium doped fiber amplifier

Catalog description: Project-oriented investigations of laser characteristics, ellipsometry, holography, optical pattern recognition and spectroscopy. Emphasis is on the applications of optics, computer data acquisition and analysis to measurement problems electronics. 1 cr. hr.

Prerequisite(s): EOP 541L, or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Qiwen Zhan, qzhan1@udayton.edu

Textbook: There is no formal textbook required for this course. The project manuals developed by Qiwen Zhan will be distributed to the students electronically at the beginning of the semester.

Syllabus:

  1. Optical spectroscopy
  2. Laser and laser characterization
  3. Computer generated holography
  4. Spectroscopic ellipsometer
  5. Optical pattern recognition 

Digital Holography

Course description: Basic principles of holography, digital holography (DH), holographic interferometry, holographic microscopy and tomography, multi-wavelength DH, phase-shifting holography, compressive holography, dynamic holography, transport of intensity imaging, etc. with selected applications to real-world problems. Lab demos. 

Instructor: Partha Banerjee, pbanerjee1@udayton.edu

Design of Optical Thin Films

Course description: Fundamentals of thin film design; antireflection and optical filter design; numerical methods; metal film optics; fabrication methods; design exercise. 

Instructor: Andrew Sarangan, sarangan@udayton.edu

Introduction to LiDAR

Course description: Survey of principles of direct detection and coherent detection ladar systems, ladar sources and receivers, effects of illumination path and object scattering, basic ladar range equation, elements of detection theory as applied to direct detection ladar systems. 

Instructors: Paul McManamon, paul@excitingtechnology.com, Edward Watson, ewatson1@udayton.edu

Introduction to Optical Project Design w/ Zemax

Course description: Introduction to ZEMAX, fundamental skills for designing practical optical systems, project design with ZEMAX, use of ZEMAX database of sample files, including three real typical design projects. Full access to ZEMAX for 60 days after the course with follow-up discussions. 

Instructor: Cong Deng, cdeng1@uayton.edu

Quantum Photonics 

Course description: Review of quantum mechanics and density matrix methods, qubits and qubit operations, quantum logic gates and quantum circuits, quantum states of light, quantum theory of measurement, introduction to measurement based linear optics quantum computing, quantum communications and cryptography.

Instructor: Imad Agha, iagha1@udayton.edu 

Ultrafast Optics

Course description: The course is to address issues of ultrafast optics.  Topics to be covered: Linear and nonlinear ultrafast pulse propagation; Generation of ultrafast pulses via mode-locking; Ultrafast pulse characterization; Ultrafast pulse applications in research and industry.

Instructor: Andy Chong achong1@udayton.edu  

Practical Guide to Construction of Optical Systems

Course description: Students will learn the basic and advanced experimental skills on the construction of research-level optical system. This course will help students build experimental systems for their own research project..

Instructor: Chenglong Zhao czhao1@udayton.edu

*Each short course is 1 cr. hr./ 2 CEUs and for 1 week.

The objective of this course is to provide an opportunity and flexibility for a student to study a topic of their choosing in a depth appropriate for the MS level under the guidance of an instructor. 1-6 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.


Catalog description: Research project on a selected topic for non-thesis MS students; Review of relevant research literature; Preparation of a written project report and an oral presentation to the student exam committee. 0 cr. hrs.

Instructor: Student’s MS research (non-thesis) adviser.

Syllabus:

Same as catalog description. The objective of this course is to ensure that MS students who choose the non-thesis route have the opportunity to demonstrate the skills necessary to write professional documents and make technical presentations on a chosen research topic.


Catalog description: Thesis in Electro-Optics. 1-6 cr. hrs.

Instructor: Student’s M.S. thesis adviser

Thesis credits can be taken in any increment up to the required 6 credit hours. However, students are advised that 6 credit hours of research work by itself will normally be insufficient to meet the standards of the MS thesis. The students should remain enrolled in EOP 510 throughout their MS program of study.


Catalog Description: Chromatic aberrations: doublet lens; telephoto, wide-angle, and normal lenses; triplet lens design and variations; optimization methods and computer lens design; optical transfer functions; telescopes and microscopes; two-mirror telescope design: aspheric surfaces; prism and folded optical systems, rangefinders; gratings and holographic optical elements; anamorphic optical systems; zoom systems. 3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite:  EOP-501

Instructor: Cong Deng, cdeng1@udayton.edu

References:

  • Robert E. Fischer, Biljana Tadic-Galeb, and Paul R. Yoder, Optical System Design, Second Edition, SPIE Press and McGraw-Hill, 2008. ISBN 978-0-07-147248-7. 
  • Michael J. Kidger, Fundamental Optical Design, SPIE Press, 2002. ISBN 9-8194-3915-0 
  • Milton Laikin, Lens Design, 2nd Ed., Marcel-Dekker, Inc., 1995. 
  • Robert R. Shannon, The Art and Science of Optical Design, Cambridge University Press, 1997. 
  • Warren J. Smith, Modern Optical Engineering, 3rd Ed. McGraw-Hill, 2000. ISBN 0-07-135360-2 
  • Warren J. Smith and Genesee Optics Software, Inc., Modern Lens Design: A Resource Manual, McGraw-Hill, 1992. 

Syllabus:

  1. Ray tracing and image evaluation 
  2. Introduction to ZEMAX 
  3. Optimization methods and computer lens design 
  4. Telephoto, wide-angle and normal lenses 
  5. Optical transfer functions 
  6. Aspheric surfaces 
  7. Telescopes and microscopes 
  8. Optical tolerancing 
  9. Prism and folded optical systems, rangefinders 

Course Requirements

This course mixes lectures on geometrical optics and lens design with computer lab sessions using ZEMAX and Matlab.


Catalog description: Dielectric slab wave- guides; cylindrical dielectric wave-guides; multi-layer waveguides; dispersion, shifting and flattening; mode coupling and loss mechanisms; selected nonlinear waveguiding effects; integrated optical devices.

Synopsis: Monolithic integrated optical circuits (IOC) have transformed the field of optics just as integrated circuits have transformed electronics. This course will cover the fundamental principles of integrated optics that are of practical interest to scientists and graduate students in the area of optoelectronics. 3 cr. hrs.

Instructor: Andrew Sarangan, sarangan@udayton.edu

Reference Material: Course notes by Andrew Sarangan

Syllabus:

  1. Review of electromagnetic principles
  2. Optical waveguides – slab, ridge 
  3. Coupled mode theory for waveguides
  4. Coupled mode theory for periodic structures
  5. Numerical methods in integrated optics
  • Optical Shooting Method
  • Transfer Matrix Method
  • Beam Propagation Method (BPM)
  • Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD)
  1. Integrated optic devices: AO, AWG, directional couplers, MZ, FBG, ring resonators, add/drop filters, DBR lasers, DFB lasers, VCSEL’s 
  2. Design project

Catalog description: Discussion, inquiry and feedback of research progress towards a dissertation in electro-optics and photonics; review of background research literature; discussion of experimental or computation methods and results; presentation of research progress reports; review of laboratory safety protocols; participation in technical conferences and professional workshops; preparation, submission and acceptance of a technical article, with student as lead author, in a peer-reviewed journal in Electro-Optics and Photonics. 0 cr. hrs.

Instructor: TBD

Syllabus:

Same as catalog description. The objective of this course is to ensure that PhD students regularly meet with their advisers, attend research meetings and make progress in their chosen research area.


Catalog Description: Optical phenomena and techniques requiring statistical methods for practical understanding and application; relevant statistical techniques for the analysis of image processing systems and the design of laser radar systems; engineering applications of statistical techniques. 3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of the core courses of the graduate electro-optics program or permission of the chair.

Instructor: Edward Watson, ewatson1@udayton.edu 

Text: Statistical Optics by J. W. Goodman

Additional references:

  1. W. Goodman, Speckle Phenomena in Optics
  2. Wolf, Introduction to the Theory of Coherence and Polarization of Light
  3. Papoulis, Probability, Random Variables, and Stochastic Processes

Syllabus:

  1. Random variables 
  2. Stochastic processes (moments, power spectral density, Wiener-Khinchin Theorem)
  3. Modeling of optical waves
  4. Thermal light (unpolarized, polarized, and partially polarized)
  5. Noise and statistics of detection 
  6. Temporal coherence of optical fields (degree of coherence, coherence time)
  7. Spatial coherence of optical fields (mutual coherence, cross spectral density, van Cittert – Zernike Theorem, imaging as an interferometric process)
  8. Speckle (fully and partially developed, speckle in laser radar, extracting information from speckle)
  9. Photoelectron statistics (if time allows)

Catalog description: Nonlinear optical interactions, classical anharmonic oscillator model; symmetry properties of nonlinear susceptibility tensor; coupled-mode formalism; sum- and difference-frequency generation; parametric oscillators; four-wave mixing; phase conjugation; optical solitons; stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering; photorefractive effect; resonant nonlinearities. 3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): EOP 502 or equivalent.

Instructor: Partha Banerjee, pbanerjee1@udayton.edu

Text: Powers and Haus. Fundamentals of Nonlinear Optics. Boca Raton, CRC Press.

References: Nonlinear Optics, Boyd; Handbook of Nonlinear Optics, Sutherland; Nonlinear Optics, Banerjee.

Syllabus:

  1. Linear and Nonlinear Materials 
    1. Homogeneous isotropic media
    2. Crystals: Isotropic, Uniaxial, Biaxial
  2. Nonlinear Optics
    1. Microscopic origin of the nonlinearity – classical picture
    2. Heuristic model of nonlinearity
    3. Nonlinear wave equation
      1. Introduction to various processes (SHG, Raman, Brillioun, etc)
      2. Phase matching and quasi-phase matching
    4. χ(2) effects and devices
      1. Sum frequency generation
      2. Second harmonic generation
      3. Phase matching and quasi-phase matching
      4. Optical parametric generation
    5. χ(3) effects and measurements
      1. Nonlinear index of refraction
      2. Nonlinear Schrödinger equation
      3. Solitons
      4. z-scan
      5. Numerical techniques
      6. Four wave mixing and phase conjugation

Catalog description: Principles of the quantum theory of electron and photon processes; interaction of electromagnetic radiation and matter; applications to solid state and semiconductor laser systems. 3 cr. hrs.

Instructor: Andrew Sarangan, sarangan@udayton.edu

Textbook: Quantum Wells, Wires and Dots: Theoretical and Computational Physics, 3rd Ed. Paul Harrison, 2009, Wiley. 

Syllabus:

  1. Semiconductors and Heterostructures
  2. Numerical solutions to Schrodinger’s Equation 
  3. Strained Quantum Wells
  4. Quantum Wires and Dots
  5. Carrier Scattering - photons and phonons
  6. Electron Transport
  7. Optical Properties of Quantum Wells
  8. Quantum well infra-red photodetectors (QWIP)
  9. Superlattice detectors
  10. Quantum cascade lasers (QCL)

Catalog description: The fundamentals of nanoscale light-matter interactions, basic linear and nonlinear optical properties of photonic crystals and metals; nanoscale effects in photonic devices; computational and modeling techniques used in nanophotonics; nanofabrication and design tools; nanoscale optical imaging; principles of nanocharacterization tools. 3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): EOP 501, EOP 502, knowledge of electro- magnetism and radiation-matter interactions or permission from instructor.

Instructor: Qiwen Zhan, qzhan1@udayton.edu

Syllabus:

  1. Materials and modeling
  • Introduction to Nanophotonics 
  • Photonic Crystal Basics 
  • Photonic Crystal Intermediate Topics 
  • Photonic Crystal Advanced Topics 
  • Photonic Crystal Fibers 
  • Plasmonics
  • Metamaterials
  • Quantum Dots
  1. Nanofabrication
  • Thin Film Technology
  • Nano-lithography 
  • Pattern Transfer and Micromachining 
  • Epitaxial growth of nanostructures 
  1. Nanocharacterization
  • High Numerical Aperture Imaging 
  • Far-Field Optical Characterization Techniques
  • Microscopes: Scanning, e-beam, near-field, etc.

Catalog description: Foundation for physics of atmospheric optics effects using meteorology, computational fluid dynamics, and statistical wave optics. Fundamentals of atmospheric physics, global and macro optical effects, atmospheric optical turbulence and its impact on imaging systems, atmospheric optical systems modeling and performance analysis, laser beams propagation in atmosphere, mitigation and exploitation of atmospheric effects. 3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): BS in physics or electrical engineering, physical and/or Fourier optics, statistics and/or statistical optics.

Instructor: Mikhail Vorontsov, mvorontsov1@udayton.edu 

Text: class notes

Syllabus:

  1. Polarization of beams
  2. Laser communication link performance
  3. ABCD matrices
  4. Numerical techniques for atmospheric optical effects
  5. Numerical wave optics propagation basics
  6. Turbulence simulations and applications
  7. Elementary optical feedback control systems
  8. Multi-dithering wavefront control principles
  9. Phase and field conjugate adaptive optics
  10. Adaptive systems based on stochastic parallel gradient descent techniques
  11. Wavefront correctors
  12. Wavefront sensing and phase reconstruction
  13. Wavefront control and turbulence mitigation in phased fiber arrays
  14. Exploitation of turbulence effects.

Catalog description: The fundamentals and applications of the polarization properties of light; description of state of polarization; propagation of state of polarization; polarization devices; polarization in guided waves; polarization in multilayer thin films; ellipsometry and polarimetry; birefringent filters; spatially variant polarization; polarization and subwavelength structures. 3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): EOP 502, basic knowledge of electromagnetism and linear algebra or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Qiwen Zhan, qzhan1@udayton.edu 

Text: There is no formal text book required for this course. The course package is based on the set of PowerPoint notes developed by Dr. Qiwen Zhan. 

References:

  • Huard, Polarization of Light, Masson, Paris, 1996.
  • Q. Zhan, “High Resolution Microellipsometry,” chapter in Nondestructive Materials Characterization with Applications to Aircraft Materials (Eds. Meyendorf, Nagy, Rokhlin), Springer, Berlin, 2003
  • Pochi Yeh, Optical waves in layered media, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1988

Syllabus:

  1. Representation of state of polarization: Vector nature of light, Polarization ellipse, Main states of polarization, Trigonometric representation, Jones vector, Complex representation, Stokes parameters and Poincaré’s sphere, Partially polarized light and coherence matrix
  2. Propagation of state of polarization: Polarization devices, Jones matrices, Evolution of state of polarization in complex plane, Geometrical representation, Muller matrices
  3. Polarization devices based on anisotropic dielectric materials: Anisotropy, Index ellipsoid, Light in linear anisotropic medium, Induced anisotropy, Electro-optical effects, Photoelastic effects, Magneto-optical effects, Devices using optical anisotropy 
  4. Polarization in guided waves: Mode theory for waveguide and optical fiber, Induced anisotropy in waveguide and optical fiber, Devices using polarization in waveguide and optical fiber
  5. Polarization in multilayer thin films: Polarization in isotropic multilayer thin films, Polarization in anisotropic thin films, Metal thin films and surface plasmon resonance
  6. Advanced microellipsometry and polarimetry: Introduction to ellipsometer, polarimetry, Microellipsometer, Imaging microellipsometer, Scanning microellipsometer with rotational symmetry, Solid immersion nano-ellipsometer, Scanning nearfield ellipsometric microscope, Biomedical applications 
  7. Birefringent filter: Principles of birefringent filters, Types of birefringent filters, Applications of birefringent filters
  8. Spatially variant polarization: Berry’s phase, Cylindrical Vector beams, Polarization gratings
  9. Polarization and subwavelength structures: Effective medium theory, Rigorous diffraction theory, Nano-optic devices

The objective of this course is to provide an opportunity and flexibility for a student to study a topic of their choosing in a depth appropriate for the Ph.D. level under the guidance of an instructor. 1-3 cr. hrs.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

Catalog description: Dissertation in Electro-Optics. 1-30 cr. hrs.

Instructor: Student’s Ph.D. dissertation adviser

Syllabus:

Dissertation credits can be taken in any increment up to the required 30 credit hours. The students should also remain enrolled in EOP 610 throughout their Ph.D. program of study.


CONTACT

Electro-Optics and Photonics, Dr. Partha Banerjee, Department Chair

Fitz Hall
300 College Park
Dayton, Ohio 45469 - 2951
937-229-2797
Email