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Engineering Impact Report

Preparing Future Faculty

There is no cost for the students to take the one-credit hour mini-courses, and these courses will appear on their transcript, making students more competitive when applying for faculty positions. 

The University of Dayton has traditionally placed a high value on undergraduate teaching and recruiting faculty who personally invest in their students’ learning. No courses are taught by graduate assistants in the School of Engineering, so how are future academics to hone their classroom skills?

Engineering graduate students who wish to pursue a career in academia have had years of training to gain technical proficiency and hone their research interests. However, they receive little to no training on how to be effective in the classroom.

A partnership with Chaminade Julienne (CJ) High School and a new pilot program of mini-courses is changing that.

Through a collaboration between the associate dean for faculty and staff development, the Visioneering Center and the University’s Learning Teaching Center, the first of four courses was piloted in spring of 2019. Three additional courses have been proposed.

Topics that will be included in the mini-course series are innovative teaching pedagogies, such as, active and collaborative learning, entrepreneurial-minded learning, community-engaged learning, characteristics of a Marianist education, inclusive-teaching practices, course and syllabus design, learning theories, and technology in the classroom.

There is no cost for the students to take the one-credit hour mini-courses, and these courses will appear on their transcript, making students more competitive when applying for faculty positions. The pilot course is being carefully reviewed and assessed to shape the development of future mini-courses. The goal is to eventually develop a certificate for graduate students.

Partnering to Teach Engineering High School Students

Through a partnership with CJ High School in Dayton and Project Lead the Way, a national program bringing real-world STEM learning to K-12 classrooms, the School of Engineering now offers five graduate assistantships for master and Ph.D. level engineering students funded by CJ.

This mutually beneficial relationship provides graduate students with the opportunity to earn a stipend while gaining engineering teaching experience. The benefits to CJ are twofold: having teachers in their classrooms who are engaged in cutting edge engineering research and gaining access to resources from the School such as guest speakers, laboratory tours and collaborative projects.

In addition to teaching, the graduate students participate in bi-weekly professional development lunch meetings funded by the School. It is hoped that this collaboration will not only produce better teachers and more engaged students but also will serve as a recruiting tool for CJ students to consider a University of Dayton engineering education.

CONTACT

School of Engineering

Kettering Laboratories
300 College Park
Dayton, Ohio 45469 - 0254
937-229-2736
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