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James Steiner-Dillon

Assistant Professor of Law

Full-Time Faculty

Contact

Email: James Steiner-Dillon
Phone: 937-229-3228

446 Keller Hall

Profile

Professor James Steiner-Dillon joined the University of Dayton faculty in August 2018. Prior to his appointment, Professor Steiner-Dillon was an Associate in Law at Columbia Law School, where he taught legal research and writing. He previously taught Civil Procedure as an adjunct professor at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law.

After graduating from New York University School of Law in 2003, Professor Steiner-Dillon practiced litigation in the New York City offices of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP and Sullivan & Cromwell LLP, focusing on securities litigation, white collar defense, antitrust, and bankruptcy. He also clerked for the Honorable I. Leo Glasser, Senior U.S. District Judge for the Eastern District of New York.

Professor Steiner-Dillon’s scholarship focuses broadly on the construction of legal knowledge, with particular emphasis on courts’ engagement with scientific expertise. His scholarship has appeared or is forthcoming in the Indiana Law Review, the University of Cincinnati Law Review, the Columbia Science and Technology Law Review, the St. Louis University Law Journal, and the West Virginia Law Review. His work has been featured on the podcasts Ipse Dixit and Excited Utterance.

Degrees

Ph.D., Jurisprudence and Social Policy, University of California, Berkeley (2018)

M.A., Philosophy, New York University (2005)

J.D., New York University (2003)

B.A., English, West Virginia University (1999)

Selected Publications

Sticking Points: Epistemic Pluralism in Legal Challenges to Mandatory Vaccination Policies, 88 University of Cincinnati Law Review __ (forthcoming 2020).

Epistemic Exceptionalism
, 52 Indiana Law Review __ (forthcoming 2019).

Expertise on Trial, 19 Columbia Science & Technology Law Review 247 (2018)

The Hallowed Hope: The School Prayer Cases and Social Change, 59 Saint Louis University Law Journal 409 (2015) (with Lauren Maisel Goldsmith).

Doubting Demaree:  The Application of Ex Post Facto Principles to the United States Sentencing Guidelines After United States v. Booker, 110 West Virginia Law Review 1033 (2008).

Teaching Interests

Evidence

Criminal Law

Torts

Law & Science

Law & Epistemology

Jurisprudence

Conflict of Laws