90 Second Lectures

Have 90 Seconds?

Learn something life-changing — or just find a conversation starter.

We're curious. We ask scholarly questions; sometimes we ask offbeat questions. In our 90-second video lecture series, find out what happens when we give our faculty 90 seconds to ask (and answer) an intriguing question.

The University of Dayton values academic freedom and diversity of opinion. Any views expressed by an individual faculty member should not be construed as representing the opinions of the University of Dayton.

Newest Lecture

Kids & Concussions. It's Not Just Sports.

Kids sustain concussions in many ways. Can children with concussions return to school? In this video, Dr. Susan Davies explains how a trained team of medical and school professionals can work together to help kids safely return to school and play.

Most Popular Lectures

Why does everyone hate Nickelback?

Erin O'Mara, Ph.D., and Toby Rush, Ph.D., look at the music of Nickelback and the psychological factors that influence peoples' opinions of the band.

How Can We Stop Human Trafficking?

Anthony Talbott, Ph.D., looks at how we can apply social scientific method to the study of human trafficking.

 

90-Second Lecture Archive

Kids sustain concussions in many ways. Can children with concussions return to school? In this video, Dr. Susan Davies explains how a trained team of medical and school professionals can work together to help kids safely return to school and play.

 


Autonomous systems need to be able to make decisions based on what they encounter in their environment. In this 90-Second Lecture, Dr. Vijayan Asari explains how autonomous systems see and process visual data to interpret a scene.

How can we solve the problem of "missing self" in a virtual reality environment? In this 90-Second Lecture, Dr. Ju Shen explains some of the strategies being developed at the University of Dayton IVIDIA Lab to display the user's physical appearance.


We often hear about the jobs that are lost because of free trade, but Americans also benefit from trade. In this 90-Second Lecture, Trevor Collier, Ph.D., looks at the economic impact of free trade.

Erin O'Mara, Ph.D., and Toby Rush, Ph.D., look at the music of Nickelback and the psychological factors that influence peoples' opinions of the band.

 


Ruth Thompson-Miller, Ph.D., looks at the lasting effects of Jim Crow legal segregation laws and psychological consequences for survivors.

Anthony Talbott, Ph.D., looks at how we can apply social scientific method to the study of human trafficking.


Drew Murray, Ph.D., compares the energy density of gasoline to batteries (and more).

Young children are like scientists. Their purpose in life is to make sense of their world. Shauna Adams, Ed.D., helps us discover how play can be a powerful learning tool.

Couples who communicate well tend to be happier. But what happens when we work with couples to improve communication skills? Lee Dixon, Ph.D., explores this question and why teaching better communication skills might have an unintended effect.


The Wright Brothers needed a lightweight engine to power their first flight. Daniel Eylon, Ph.D., shares how several innovations in the late 1800s came together to give them the answer.

Games of "chance" are easier than you might expect — with a little statistical thinking. Michael Gorman, Ph.D., explains how to determine the optimal strategy.

We know sustainability is good for the environment. But how does it impact the rest of our lives?  Kevin Hallinan, Ph.D., looks at the economic impact of two sustainability initiatives — investing in energy efficiency improvements and buying local foods.

In this 90-Second Lecture, Dr. Toni Moore explains "inside-out leadership" and how it can light a spark in future leaders of Catholic schools.

Learn about the power of simple machines and watch us lift a car using a lever and fulcrum. Drew Murray, Ph.D., gives a simple explanation of mechanical advantage.

Our body parts work together. Changing the direction our knees bend could result in some very odd adaptations. Kimberly Ritterhoff explains why.


The truth about Columbus and why the story we learned in grade school falls a little flat.  Bill Trollinger, Ph.D., explains.