Frequently asked Questions

Below are the answers to commonly asked questions about our program.

Can men take WGS courses?

Men are welcome in all WGS courses, and as WGS majors and minors. Gender issues are relevant to everyone’s life—everyone has a gender, after all—and discussions of gender issues are best when they draw on a variety of perspectives from both women and men. Many male students have found WGS courses to be eye-opening and life-changing with regard to their career plans, their personal lives, or both.

What do I have to do to declare a WGS major?

You need to fill out a major declaration form. You can get the form by stopping by our office in Alumni Hall Room 204 or by downloading the form at right. The completed form can be hand delivered to our office or may be sent electronically to Julianne Morgan, Administrative Support Staff. Your advisor for the WGS major will be the program’s director, Dr. Rebecca Whisnant.

Email Julianne Morgan, Administrative Support Staff >>

What do I have to do to declare a WGS minor?

You need to fill out a minor declaration form. You can get the form by stopping by our office in Alumni Hall Room 204 or by downloading the form at right. The completed form can be hand delivered to our office or may be send electronically to Julianne Morgan, Administrative Support Staff.

Email Julianne Morgan, Administrative Support Staff >>

What do recent WGS students and graduates have to say about their experiences in the program?

Students often describe their WGS coursework as both intellectually and personally transformative. One student says that her WGS minor “really enhanced [her] understanding of [her] major,” while another indicated that “the WGS Program has been one of the most positive experiences of my undergraduate career – I only wish I had found it sooner!”

One recent graduate, now pursuing a master’s degree in social work and non-profit management, was invited to present to her graduate school colleagues on issues of sex and gender, and a local high school has asked her to develop a curriculum for their first-ever women’s studies course. She says, “I am definitely putting my degree to good use and am now the go-to girl in my cohort when it comes to women’s and gender issues. I was unsure when I left UD how my WGS degree would fit into my future. But as I have learned in these past few months, it is becoming an integral part in my career development as a social worker.”

Which WGS course should I take first?

Students come to WGS through any number of our affiliated departmental courses, from PHL 307 (Philosophy and Women) to HST 354 (History of Women and Gender in the Middle East), SOC 333 (Sociology of Sexualities), and many more. However, one great option is to begin with our introductory core course, WGS 150 (Introduction to Women’s Studies). In WGS 150 you’ll be exposed to a variety of disciplinary approaches to women’s and gender issues, and you’ll learn about the history and the unique perspective of women’s studies as a field of study.